Archive for the ‘Guides’ Category

Gap analysis

A Product Owner creating and maintaining documentation for new and existing features is just as important as those who maintain documentation in other roles especially developers.

Whether you use Confluence or other documentation software, having documentation makes it easy to provide context and clarity around the importance of getting after a particular feature whether it’s to the development teams or stakeholders.

When a new feature / problem / idea has cropped up, it becomes very useful to start documenting elements before any development effort is spent creating user stories or getting Product Backlog Items (PBIs) in a ‘ready‘ state. The key elements being:

  • One line description about what the feature is
  • Tagging in contacts eg. Product Owner, Technical Architect, Scrum Master, Stakeholders etc
  • Problem / Value including metrics / data
  • High-level requirements
  • As Is‘ and ‘To Be‘ flows which indicates where the gaps are
  • Competitor analysis if relevant
  • Actions / Next Steps
  • Technical details
  • Identifying and Tagging in dependencies

Having ‘As Is’ (Current State) and ‘To Be’ (Desired State) flows is a great way of clearly identifying where the gaps are, where you need to get to, what your competitors are doing in addition and what you need to do to get to your desired state. Having requirements visualised in this way also provides clarity of what you’re looking to achieve and becomes an easy way to digest and collaborate on the requirements vs. a long list of written requirements.

Spending time documenting the analysis of the idea / problem will help get the idea to a customer as efficiently as possible, providing clarity to the stakeholders and developers as to the ‘what‘ and ‘why‘.

With facilitating processes and tasks at the heart of the Scrum Master role, it requires someone with a proactive, helpful, motivated, can do, kind, organised and supportive mindset in order for requirements to be solved in an efficient way in the right priority order.

With the Product Owner, Developers, QAs, Technical Architect and Stakeholders all focused on getting their job done where there are clear boundaries, it needs someone to fill any missing gaps or connect them together in order to get the job done, which is where the Scrum Master comes in.

Let’s look at a day in the life of a Scrum Master:

Scrum master

Done

Once the product backlog is in a good quality condition and the product backlog items (PBIs) start moving into development, there’s a significant amount of tasks to tick off before the feature can be marked as ‘done’.

Typically a development team would use a ‘definition of done’ (DoD) as a reference to ensure that none of the processes get missed off before it’s ‘done’, as each of those processes are essential and could have considerable consequences for the business and customers if it’s not done.

Some examples of what could be in a definition of done:

  • Code is reviewed by someone who didn’t do the PBI
  • Code is deployed to test environment
  • Feature is tested against acceptance criteria
  • Feature passes regression testing
  • Feature passes smoke test
  • Feature is documented
  • Feature approved by UX designer / stakeholder
  • Feature approved by Product Owner

Missing any of the DoD processes before a feature gets delivered to a customer could result in critical bugs across the feature, causing bugs across other features in the code, bring down the product or delivering the wrong requirement, so it’s essential to take the definition of done seriously even if it means taking the PBI over to the next sprint resulting in potentially not meeting a sprint goal.

Once you’ve created a solid Product Vision, it’s likely you’ll be asked to provide more granular details on the ‘what’ and ‘when’ and the Product Roadmap is a great way of helping you answer that.

The product roadmap is also a good way of giving the development teams an idea of the exciting upcoming features / problems to solve for the product.

Key points of a Product Roadmap:

  • It should be at a high level eg. Epic, feature or iteration level – Epic level is a preference as then it maps nicely to the product backlog items (PBI)
  • It needs to include dates spanning the next twelve months whether monthly or quarterly
  • The bars on the chart show when items start and when the development will be complete (live hidden)
  • One of the most important things is to educate development teams and stakeholders that the drop dates are an intent (not commitment) of focus / delivery and that things can and will likely change, so it’s advisable to avoid spending significant amounts of time making each item exact, as the desire from the business would be to have a rough idea of the twelve month view rather than knowing whether something starting in six months time will be delivered exactly a month later than that for example
  • The roadmap needs to be easily accessible by anyone in the business where they can use their network login and can also access it from outside the office eg. on the train – if it’s hard to access, people just won’t view it and assume there’s no plan
  • It needs to be updated frequently – if it’s regularly out of date, again people just won’t access it

Product Roadmap examples

Roadmap sample 1

Roadmap sample 2

The most important thing about the Product Roadmap is to always provide a sign of intent for when product items will be delivered over the next twelve months, with the key word being ‘intent’ here ie. Not exact drop dead delivery date and a couple of people with experience of productivity could use gut feel which is totally acceptable, rather than dragging developers away for days on end to roughly size big pieces of work which will either 1. Change anyway and 2. Be extremely inaccurate as unknowns result in estimates going through the roof.

A sign of intent for the next twelve months for the product is also better than a half empty roadmap!

Vision

It’s worth spending time coming up with a compelling vision statement, because it’s something which will be repeated over and over again as it’s the key driver to drum up excitement, passion, investment, confidence and trust that the product end goal is rather spectacular, solving the big problems and then in turn delivering huge value for the business and customers.

First things first, craft your vision statement which should only be one clear sentence, where in a nutshell it should explain what you’re looking to deliver, to who and why giving off a wow factor:

Vision statement

Then create a product vision board specifying who the target market is for your product, problems the product solves, clarifying what the product is and how the product is going to benefit the business and customers:

Vision board

Lastly, having a vision diagram is a great way of providing stakeholders and the business with a snapshot using one image of where you’re at with the product and where you’re heading. Having colour coding for ‘live’, ‘in progress’, ‘planned’ and ‘to do’ would cover it – there are plenty of mind map tools to help you visualise your product, one of which is Lucidchart which comes as a plugin for Confluence also. It’s important to keep the product diagram focused on high level features rather than detailed technical solutions around systems as that would be more of a technical architectural diagram:

Vision diagram

Having a solid product vision isn’t just to help the business allocate resource, but it’s also essential for the developers to know exactly where they need to head and ‘why’.

The Product Group London

If you’re a Product Owner or Product Manager and would like to participate in a variety of interesting product focused discussions, then The Product Group London is for you.

It’s also an opportunity to meet, interact and network with those in a similar role who solve similar problems and have similar challenges.

At the monthly meetups there’s normally a topic of the night and a featured product which gets discussed. For example, the July 2018 agenda was:

  1. Topic of the Night: Developing the role of product management – how do you develop the role of product management in organisations that either (1) have no formal product function, (2) have a product function that is not realising its potential, or (3) have a well-established function and need to develop it to the next level?
  2. Featured Product: Clear Review – Stuart Hearn, Founder & CEO

You can also:

Conversion1

Neil’s Recruitment have recently posted a fantastic Paid Search resource guide for grads, 1st / 2nd jobbers and those who are keen to know more about the ins and outs of paid search advertising.

The Paid Search guide which can be accessed here includes:

  • The conversion funnel
  • What is paid search aka PPC & where does it fit in
  • Basics
  • Free training webinar
  • Blogs & trade press
  • Things to research / understand
  • Glossary

It’s good to see recruitment companies like this going the extra mile to educate those who are new to digital advertising, which also clearly shows they themselves have a deep understanding on the subject.