Archive for the ‘Guides’ Category

Lean

A product team is never short of customer problems to solve or ideas to validate, so if there are activities in the idea -> customer flow which are wasteful, then this impacts delivering customer/business value, motivation and time to market.

In the middle of the 20th century, Toyota created an efficient manufacturing concept called Lean which grew out of their Toyota Production System. It is based on the philosophy of defining value from the customer’s viewpoint and continually improving the way in which value is delivered, by eliminating waste or anything which does not contribute to the value goal.

The core 5 principles for adopting a Lean way of working for a digital product are:

  1. Define Value – Understand and define what is valuable to your customers.
  2. Map the Value Stream – Using your customer’s value as a reference point, map out the activities you take to contribute to these values throughout the idea -> customer flow. Also map out all of the activities which don’t contribute to delivering customer value which is essentially waste and should be reduced as much as possible.
  3. Create Flow – Once you have removed the waste from the value stream, the focus should be on ensuring that the remaining activities which are valuable, flow smoothly without interruptions or delays, with some strategies including: DevOps practices, automation, breaking down steps, creating cross-functional departments and training employees to be multi-skilled and adaptive.
  4. Establish Pull – The goal of a pull-based system is to limit your work in process (WIP) items while ensuring that your highest priority customer Product Backlog Items (PBIs) are in a ready state for a smooth flow of work. By following the value stream and working backwards through the idea -> customer flow, you can ensure that your product development will be able to satisfy the needs of your customers.
  5. Pursue Perfection – Every employee should strive towards perfection while delivering products that customers needs and love. The company should be a learning organisation and always find ways to get a little better each and every day.

Some examples of my experience on reducing waste to deliver more customer value:

We introduced DevOps, where we optimised our release pipeline making it 83% quicker to deploy software updates to the team environment and 92% quicker to deploy builds to live.

We reduced the time to market for a new website from 18 months to just 4 weeks! This was achieved by identifying waste through value stream mapping, then using that analysis to simplify the code base and reconfigure some of the hard coded elements of the code (waste) to make them remotely configurable through a CMS.

The last example had the most impact where we merged a floor of front-end developers with a floor of back-end developers to create cross-functional high performing teams.

Good luck in your journey to become Lean!

If you’re a product owner, associate product manager or product manager wanting to understand the full breadth of the product manager role, I’ve put together a generic product manager job description, so that gap analysis can be done to learn and gain experience in your knowledge gaps, which will set you up for success in the world of product management.

It’s unlikely that you will be provided with guidance or training on the full breadth of the product manager role and it’s up to you to proactively fill in your knowledge gap by testing and learning new ways of working with your product, reading books and being curious by collaborating with different areas of the business to find out more about the customer, their role and product performance.

About the role:

The Product Manager will join the product management team and take the pivotal role of managing their product line and its outcome on the customer and business.

The candidate will manage the entire product life-cycle across their product line to solve customer and/or business problems using Agile and Lean principles, by collaborating with their cross-functional team (which also includes a product designer and several engineers), as well as key stakeholders including other product managers across other product lines, BI, commercial, operations, marketing, brand, customer support and legal / compliance teams – the Product Manager is at the heart of the business, so building strong relationships and having good communication skills is important.

The Product Manager is expected to:

  • Define, manage and share the vision, missions, KPI’s, strategies and roadmap for their product line.
  • Own and manage the product backlog, so that the highest priority PBI’s are ready to be solved / validated with a PRD / hypothesis.
  • Manage all aspects of in-life products for their product line, including customer feedback, requirements, and issues.
  • Proactively collect and analyse qualitative and quantitative data to aid prioritisation and to explain why the problem is worth solving.
  • Have a deep understanding of customers by talking to customers and customer support frequently.
  • Collaborate with marketing to continually grow the product.
  • Discover new ideas / problems in collaboration with stakeholders.
  • Drive action across the business to get time sensitive product iterations to market on time.
  • Review how time to market can be reduced across their product line using Lean principles.
  • Manage stakeholder expectations when there are multiple constraints.
  • Adapt to change quickly and creatively find ways to validate ideas with customers in a Lean way.
  • Proactively remove any impediments from getting the value from idea to the customer.
  • Clearly describe what problem we need to solve, the value and customer flows to the development teams and stakeholders.
  • Dynamically switch from live support / BAU to long term strategy on a day-to-day basis.
  • Monitor product performance daily and communicate wins across the business.
  • Monitor and research the market to understand competitor SWOT.
  • Present product performance to senior stakeholders quarterly.
  • Create and share a product delivery update every two weeks.
  • Be the player and use the product frequently including user acceptance testing.
  • Line manage and mentor associate product managers.

Overall

  • Embracing their product line knowledge and effectively sharing with other team members and stakeholders.
  • Evangelising their product.
  • Striving to make progress towards their KPI goals everyday.
  • Leading the go to market (GTM) strategy within Agile methodologies.
  • Focusing on outcomes rather than outputs.
  • Accountable for the success of their product line.

Position Qualification & Experience Requirements

  • Passionate about solving customer problems.
  • Proactive with stakeholder engagement.
  • Proven track record of managing all aspects of a successful product.
  • Strong time management and organisational skills.
  • Experience with Scrum, Kanban and Lean principles and methods.
  • Strong problem solving skills and willingness to roll up one’s sleeves to get the job done.
  • Will give exemplary attention to detail and have excellent communication skills.
  • Is creative with an analytical approach and can easily switch between creative and analytical work.
  • Outgoing, positive and forward thinking.
  • Excellent communicator of product updates, trends, priority and the rationale behind them.
  • Have an obsession with creating great products with your team that customers love.
  • Has a high EQ.
  • Become the voice of the customer – be an expert on quantitative and qualitative insights.
  • Experience with tools such as Tableau, Aha!, Google Analytics, Mixpanel, Jira, Confluence, Lucidchart, Firebase or other equivalent tools.

Less

LeSS (Large Scale Scrum) is an agile framework for 3-8 Scrum teams, but when there’s more than 8 Scrum teams it’s time to think about adopting LeSS Huge. So let’s look at the differences.

LeSS
LeSS is a scaled up version of one-team Scrum, and it maintains many of the practices and ideas of one-team Scrum. In LeSS, you will find:

In LeSS all Teams are in a common sprint to deliver a common shippable product, every sprint.

LeSS Huge

Less-huge

What’s the same as the smaller LeSS Framework:

  • One (overall) Product Backlog
  • One Definition of Done
  • One Definition of Ready
  • One (overall) Senior/Lead Product Manager
  • One Sprint

So what’s Different?

  • Area Product Managers
  • Area Product Backlogs
  • Area Product Vision
  • Set of parallel meetings per Area

It’s important to remember that these frameworks are just guides and every business has their own org structure, so it’s completely acceptable to mould a framework to suit the organisational structure and industry sector.

Pipeline

With a long list of ideas / problems (features) to solve, there needs to be a solid view of exactly where features are in the idea to customer flow, so that anyone can view the status of a feature anytime without constantly asking.

Having a ‘feature pipeline’ report also proves helpful when providing stakeholder monthly / quarterly product updates.

A feature pipeline typically has multiple columns similar to a Kanban view, but it’s important to keep the content at a high- level (feature / epic) rather than stories.

Pipeline

Example Feature Pipeline Format

Some of the columns you’d have on a Feature Pipeline would be:

  1. ‘Idea’: which would be a long list of features sorted by value
  2. To Be T-Shirt Sized‘ (WIP 5): top 5 highest value features move over to a sizing column – in order for the idea to be prioritised on the product roadmap you need a rough size. It’s recommended to have a WIP (work in progress) limit
  3. Capacity Planning‘: once the feature has been roughly sized, it’s then possible to analyse when the feature can be worked on based on capacity and priority (value vs. effort (t-shirt size))
  4. Delivery Quarter‘: based on the capacity planner which should drive the start and end dates of features on the product roadmap, what quarter does the feature planned to be delivered in

There are plenty of tools available to visualise your feature pipeline eg. Aha! and JIRA and it’s a good idea to compliment that with a guide which includes SLAs for each stage of the pipeline and a t-shirt size mapping, so it’s clear what a ‘Small’ or ‘Large’ is for example.

Having a Feature Pipeline in your product toolkit for everyone to access when they want will help ensure that high priority ideas get to customers in a timely and transparent way.

Gap analysis

A Product Manager creating and maintaining documentation for new and existing features is just as important as those who maintain documentation in other roles especially developers.

Whether you use Confluence or other documentation software, having documentation makes it easy to provide context and clarity around the importance of getting after a particular feature whether it’s to the development teams or stakeholders.

When a new feature / problem / idea has cropped up, it becomes very useful to start documenting elements before any development effort is spent creating user stories or getting Product Backlog Items (PBIs) in a ‘ready‘ state. The key elements being:

  • One line description about what the feature is
  • Tagging in contacts eg. Product Manager, Technical Architect, Scrum Master, Stakeholders etc
  • Problem / Value including metrics / data
  • High-level requirements
  • As Is‘ and ‘To Be‘ flows which indicates where the gaps are
  • Competitor analysis if relevant
  • Actions / Next Steps
  • Technical details
  • Identifying and Tagging in dependencies

Having ‘As Is’ (Current State) and ‘To Be’ (Desired State) flows is a great way of clearly identifying where the gaps are, where you need to get to, what your competitors are doing in addition and what you need to do to get to your desired state. Having requirements visualised in this way also provides clarity of what you’re looking to achieve and becomes an easy way to digest and collaborate on the requirements vs. a long list of written requirements.

Spending time documenting the analysis of the idea / problem will help get the idea to a customer as efficiently as possible, providing clarity to the stakeholders and developers as to the ‘what‘ and ‘why‘.

With facilitating processes and tasks at the heart of the Scrum Master role, it requires someone with a proactive, helpful, motivated, can do, kind, organised and supportive mindset in order for requirements to be solved in an efficient way in the right priority order.

With the Product Manager, Developers, QAs, Technical Architect and Stakeholders all focused on getting their job done where there are clear boundaries, it needs someone to fill any missing gaps or connect them together in order to get the job done, which is where the Scrum Master comes in.

Let’s look at a day in the life of a Scrum Master:

Scrum master

Done

Once the product backlog is in a good quality condition and the product backlog items (PBIs) start moving into development, there’s a significant amount of tasks to tick off before the feature can be marked as ‘done’ and therefore ready to ship.

Typically a development team would use a ‘definition of done’ (DoD) as a reference to ensure that none of the processes gets missed off before it’s ‘done’, as each of those processes are essential and could have considerable consequences for the business and customers if it’s not done.

Some examples of what could be in a definition of done:

  • Code is reviewed by someone who didn’t do the PBI
  • Code is deployed to test environment
  • Unit tests complete
  • Feature is tested against acceptance criteria
  • Feature passes regression testing
  • Feature passes smoke test
  • Feature is documented
  • Feature has analytics tracking
  • Feature is approved by Product Manager

Missing any of the DoD processes before a feature gets delivered to a customer could result in critical bugs across the feature, causing bugs across other features in the code, bring down the product, delivering the wrong requirement or not being able to measure the outcome of the output, so it’s essential to take the definition of done seriously even if it means taking the PBI over to the next sprint resulting in potentially not meeting a sprint goal.

The Product Group London

If you’re a Product Owner or Product Manager and would like to participate in a variety of interesting product focused discussions, then The Product Group London is for you.

It’s also an opportunity to meet, interact and network with those in a similar role who solve similar problems and have similar challenges.

At the monthly meetups there’s normally a topic of the night and a featured product which gets discussed. For example, the July 2018 agenda was:

  1. Topic of the Night: Developing the role of product management – how do you develop the role of product management in organisations that either (1) have no formal product function, (2) have a product function that is not realising its potential, or (3) have a well-established function and need to develop it to the next level?
  2. Featured Product: Clear Review – Stuart Hearn, Founder & CEO

You can also:

Conversion1

Neil’s Recruitment have recently posted a fantastic Paid Search resource guide for grads, 1st / 2nd jobbers and those who are keen to know more about the ins and outs of paid search advertising.

The Paid Search guide which can be accessed here includes:

  • The conversion funnel
  • What is paid search aka PPC & where does it fit in
  • Basics
  • Free training webinar
  • Blogs & trade press
  • Things to research / understand
  • Glossary

It’s good to see recruitment companies like this going the extra mile to educate those who are new to digital advertising, which also clearly shows they themselves have a deep understanding on the subject.

Resource guide
Neil’s Recruitment have come up with some handy tips for writing your cover letter, honing your CV and helping you stand out in an interview:

NRC_RTB_V1-2

Neil’s Recruitment have recently posted a fantastic RTB resource guide for grads, 1st / 2nd jobbers and those who are keen to know more about what RTB is along with all those other 3 letter acronyms.

The RTB guide which can be accessed here includes:

  • What is RTB
  • Free training webinar
  • Blogs and trade press
  • Things to research/understand
  • Excel tips
  • Maths practice
  • Glossary

It’s good to see recruitment companies like this going the extra mile to educate those who are new to digital advertising, which also clearly shows they themselves have a deep understanding on the subject.

20130716

With such huge global reach and engaging ad formats, Facebook has now become a very powerful CRM tool.

Similar to display CRM, this activity would usually fall under the programmatic buying team. When thinking about what strategies to setup, it’s always good to discuss them first with the central CRM team.

Facebook CRM should run across both Facebook Marketplace and FBX. You can still use a consistant strategy structure which would be in line with display – remarketing site visitors who didn’t get passed the first conversion step, remarketing those who drop off during the conversion process and remarketing those who have converted (current customers).

For FB Marketplace you will need to rely on the CRM team heavily to provide an up to date list of email addresses by segment / strategy as targeting is by email addess (custom audience targeting). This can then be used for including / excluding at time of strategy setup. As well as targeting by email you can also target your existing FB fan base within Marketplace. The good thing about CRM across FB Marketplace is that you can deliver ads across all formats including mobile install ads.

For FBX, this is all cookie based so you can mirror the display setup 1-1. You can only deliver basic ads across the news feed and ASUs for FBX.

When it comes to post click performance, all clients will notice a dramatic improvement vs. display CRM (+250% CTR and +350% click to pixel / conversion event) but for CRM campaigns it’s all about having up to date bespoke creative, a reasonable freq. cap and bid to match the segment. Also it’s essential to have exposure across as many channels as possible for CRM and all of this is a priority over performance.

image

Using a DSP on a self service basis lets you set your own rules and strategy structure therefore site remarketing strategies should be completely separate from prospecting. It’s essential to separate them as the KPIs and strategy between prospecting and CRM are so different (similar to brand and generic search) – it’s a classic way of how a lot of ad networks used to over represent the real prospecting display results by including remarketing strategies within prospecting campaign results.

From remarketing site visitors who have bounced, to remarketing high value customers, the set-up should be bespoke to the segment. The further you get in the user journey, the less cookies there will be allowing you to be able to afford to be more aggressive as there’s less risk of budget getting out of control, also the further your customers get in the journey, the more you want to keep them (as their value increases):

Let’s start with remarketing people who have visited but not registered their details – a tight frequency should be implemented and reasonably low CPM.

Dependent on your user journey you should then split out your remarketing strategies by segment (which should all be list in your cookie CRM database) eg. Age, gender, country, product, user level – as the segment becomes more valuable to your business, the frequency cap should be loosened and CPM increased.

As well as the media strategies, the likes of creative and ongoing promotions are crucial for success in this area – it’s not going to help serving your high value customers banners telling them to sign up again or promote an out of date offer. A reminder of what’s currently available, what’s just launched, cross sell, RAF, special offers and what’s coming soon are the basics.

Remember, the harder you work on CRM and generally looking after your customers to avoid them leaving, the more you can afford to pay for new customers which has a positive effect on the incremental volume you can drive (referring to the classic volume price curve).