Posts Tagged ‘strategy’

Analytics

The short answer is yes – the product/team will definitely benefit by having web/app analytics tracking as part of the definition of done (DoD).

The only time that a separate analytics tracking story should be written and played is typically in the scenario of:

  1. There’s no existing analytics tracking, so there’s tracking debt to deal with including the initial API integration
  2. A migration from one analytics provider to another

The reason why it’s super important to ensure that analytics/tracking is baked into the actual feature acceptance criteria/DoD, is so then:

  1. It doesn’t get forgotten
  2. It forces analytics tracking to be included in MVP/each product iteration as default
  3. It drives home that having tracking attached to a feature before it goes live is just as important as QAing, load testing, regression testing or code reviews

Unless you can measure the impact of a feature, it’s hard to celebrate success, prove the hypothesis/whether it delivered the expected outcome or know whether it delivered any business value – the purpose of product development isn’t to deliver stories or points, it’s to deliver outcomes.

Having a data-driven strategy isn’t the future, it’s now and the advertising industry adopted this analytics tracking philosophy over two decades ago, so including analytics tracking within the DoD will only help set the product/team in the right direction.

Strategy

VMOST = Vision, Missions, Objectives, Strategies and Tactics

Each product should have a clearly defined product vision, KPIs and strategies if it’s expected for the development team to deliver outcomes/head in the right direction and using the VMOST canvas is an effective way of showcasing what these are in a clear and concise format.

VMOST example

Vision: A passionate and exciting statement which typically should only be one sentence, where in a nutshell it should explain what your ambition is/what is your end goal of the product and who it’s for. More info on creating a compelling product vision can be found here.

Missions: In order to achieve the product vision, there would be multiple high-level missions you need to go on – what are the biggest problems which need solving before achieving the vision.

Objectives (KPIs): You can track progress of your missions through setting multiple objectives (aka KPIs), which would include metrics which are measurable.

Strategies: Initiatives which would deliver/impact the objectives (KPIs).

Tactics: Multiple ideas (Epics) which would deliver each strategy. The tactics should be laid out on the product roadmap, so there’s a nice link between the product VMOST and product roadmap.

Although the product owner is responsible for defining and owning the product VMOST, it’s important that it doesn’t happen in silo, as it takes collaboration with the rest of the business especially stakeholders/data/customers to help provide some guidance on the selection of problems to solve which would be represented on the VMOST.

Once the VMOST is ready, it’s time for the product owner to showcase this in a passionate way across the business and perhaps print it out on A0 to sit near the scrum team on the wall, so it can always be top of mind.

Good luck in creating your VMOST!!

Scale

Once a product is mature and the product roadmap is filled up with valuable product iterations, it’s likely that the product owner and senior management will be keen to find out how some of the financial value driving product iterations can be delivered sooner.

Whilst having to balance technology improvements, technical debt, regulatory, security, bugs, dev ops and business requirements with only having one development team on the product stream would make this difficult, as there’s little room to work on multiple different types of work concurrently eg. business requirements concurrently with the more technical driven requirements.

To work on different sets of requirements concurrently, the product would need to scale which would involve adding additional product development teams to the product line. With more development teams working on the product would also require additional firepower from the technical architect and product owner role if delivery is to remain efficient and ROI positive.

An example of how you can scale the product owner role across multiple development teams who are working on the same product line:

Chief Product Owner (CPO)

  • Responsible for ensuring that the Product Owners are handling their product lines effectively
  • Handling the high level product strategy across all product lines

Product Owner (PO) / Senior Product Owner (SPO) of the Product Line

  • Market analysis
  • Competitor analysis
  • Customer analysis
  • Trends
  • Product line strategy
  • Product Vision
  • Product Roadmap
  • Backlog prioritisation
  • Epic / feature scoping
  • Backlog grooming
  • Sprint planning

Product Owner of the Development Teams (Associate Product Owner (APO))

  • Customer analysis
  • Epic breakdown
  • Requirement workshops
  • User story definition
  • Detailed acceptance criteria
  • Backlog grooming
  • Sprint planning
  • Acceptance of user stories
  • Retrospectives
  • Daily stand-up

The Associate Product Owner of the development teams could also be referred to as Feature Product Owner, Junior Product Owner, Product Executive or Business Analyst.

In order for the Product Owner to be able to focus on the product vision, prioritisation of the product backlog and product strategy to ensure the product remains competitive, it’s important that when adding additional development teams to the product that they get additional product owner support to help them out with the more tactical day to day activities, as you can see from the split in tasks above – Product Line Owner handling more strategic tasks especially prioritisation in all instances and the Associate Product Owner handles more tactical tasks.

Spreading a product owner too thin with little support could result in a lack of focus on both product strategy and getting product backlog items delivered in an efficient way.

Ops

All products will have an element of BAU (business as usual) and strategic work, where both are equally important to get after if the product is to remain competitive now and in years to come.

BAU work can also be referred to as ops (operational) work and I’ve always preferred the word ‘Ops’ over ‘BAU’ because no problem to solve should be looked at as solving it in the usual way which BAU can often be treated like. Also there’s often a stigma attached to BAU irrelevant of the business value it drives which is bonkers, so let’s look at the definitions of both:

  • BAU – work which doesn’t involve significant architecture redesign or thought, but BAU work is typically the blood line of the business
  • Strategic – work which involves a significant amount of up front technical design and often uses the latest / next generation technology. Strategic work often comes into play if there’s an architectural org restructure, the existing technical platform is no longer fit for purpose or it’s a new product

When it comes to delivering either BAU or Strategic work, there’s a couple of ways:

  1. Simply follow the same agile process which any other problem does, which includes adding a high level PBI (Product Backlog Item) detailing the problem to solve with value and then the Scrum Master / Team Lead looks well ahead in the product backlog to start contemplating approaching the ‘how’ with very close collaboration with the Technical Architect (TA) with the aim to get the item in a ‘Ready‘ state for development. This would in turn lead to the development teams planning in Technical Support backlog items to help the TA with technical designs, spikes or investigations well in advance of the problem appearing towards the top of the backlog which applies to both Scrum and Kanban.
  2. Split development resource into BAU only and Strategic only

The risk with No 1 is that the Scrum Master doesn’t collaborate with the Technical Architect soon enough resulting in the PBI hitting the top of the backlog before technical designs have started, causing significant delays to getting after the strategic work.

But there’s a much bigger risk to No 2 where there would naturally be a big reluctance for a team to work purely on BAU and therefore miss out on any green field project and there’s risk of breaking the ‘One Team’ mentality across the product development teams working on the whole product together and in turn impacting team morale.

Invest

In order to avoid lots of panic and chaos the day before sprint planning because there’s no work in a ‘ready‘ state, it’s essential to have regular backlog grooming sessions which would result in having at least six weeks’ worth of high priority ‘ready’ work in the product backlog.

To get PBI’s (Product Backlog Items) in a ready state, it can take a lot of effort especially when it comes to chasing down dependencies or getting answers around the business requirements, but this is where the Scrum Master comes in to help out – although the Product Owner owns the product backlog, it’s the responsibility of the Scrum Master to help, guide and support the team to ensure they’re having frequent effective backlog grooming sessions, so there’s a good few weeks worth of ready PBI’s.

A new PBI is the start of a conversation and shouldn’t include solutions, so there should be ongoing questions around the requirements well in advance of the work going into development, until the development team feel they have enough information to size the PBI and then mark it as ready if there’s no dependencies.

It’s important to have a good quality product backlog (high priority items in a ready state) and frequently groom PBIs, to ensure the development teams are not only working on the highest priority items, but also that they’re working in an efficient way.

Some tips to getting a good quality product backlog:

  1. Create the user stories and prioritise in the backlog sooner rather than later – as a minimum the story needs to include ‘as a’, ‘I want’, ‘so that’ language with some high level acceptance criteria which will help start the conversation with the developers, giving them weeks to ask questions up front before it appears towards the top of the backlog.
  2. Making the problem / requirements clear with a stakeholder point of contact within the story for reference
  3. Having a clear title (summary) to the story, so you don’t have to open it up to find out what it’s about
  4. When there are questions from the developers to answer either by the Sub Product Owner (or Product Owner), stakeholders or technical, try to avoid leaving these unanswered for days – these should be responded to immediately as a priority
  5. For the ‘Feature Backlog‘ to be presented to the team monthly or bi-monthly, so they know clearly what the value of the relevant PBI’s are with some context around them
  6. Having flexible backlog grooming sessions – there’s no rule here, the teams can get together everyday if they like to groom the backlog until they’ve caught up
  7. Reinforcing to the development teams that they don’t need to know exactly what code to write and where in order to size the PBI, but instead the sizing should be based on a suitable solution making some assumptions
  8. Attaching customer flows / UX to the PBIs, with a link to ‘As Is’ and ‘To Be’ documentation

At least 10% of the teams time should be spent on grooming the product backlog and unless enough time is invested or they don’t get the support they need from the Scrum Master or Product Owner, then there’s risk of inefficiencies or the teams working on low priority PBI’s (Product Backlog Items) as the high priority items aren’t being groomed enough in time for sprint planning.

Vision

It’s worth spending time coming up with a compelling vision statement, because it’s something which will be repeated over and over again as it’s the key driver to drum up excitement, passion, investment, confidence and trust that the product end goal is rather spectacular, solving the big problems and then in turn delivering huge value for the business and customers.

First things first, craft your vision statement which should only be one clear sentence, where in a nutshell it should explain what you’re looking to deliver, to who and why giving off a wow factor:

Vision statement

Then create a product vision board specifying who the target market is for your product, problems the product solves, clarifying what the product is and how the product is going to benefit the business and customers:

Vision board

Lastly, having a vision diagram is a great way of providing stakeholders and the business with a snapshot using one image of where you’re at with the product and where you’re heading. Having colour coding for ‘live’, ‘in progress’, ‘planned’ and ‘to do’ would cover it – there are plenty of mind map tools to help you visualise your product, one of which is Lucidchart which comes as a plugin for Confluence also. It’s important to keep the product diagram focused on high level features rather than detailed technical solutions around systems as that would be more of a technical architectural diagram:

Vision diagram

Having a solid product vision isn’t just to help the business allocate resource, but it’s also essential for the developers to know exactly where they need to head and why.