It was a pleasure to contribute to the Trusted Tech Talk roundtable discussion on stakeholder collaboration in product management. Maxwell Bond who organised it has crafted this fantastic whitepaper summarising the discussion which includes some handy tips for product managers.

Know your customers through qual and quant data, then prioritise their problems ruthlessly.

How can PMs encourage more teammates to use data?

It was a pleasure to contribute to this article on how Product Manager’s can encourage more teammates to use data. Full article can be found here.

“Working with data helps companies across the board to unlock their potential and become more productive and better at making decisions. However, making people in the team and company rely on data involves a lot of work. Product managers must often set a strategy, reinvent processes, and change organizational behavior. 

To find out how to make more people in the team use data in decision-making and daily work, we spoke to product managers from different companies and industries. Their answers provide insights about the following:

  • Which members of product teams can benefit most from using data? 
  • What are the key barriers to using data by all members of your product team? 
  • How to overcome the barriers mentioned above? 
  • What specific tactics can help to increase the adoption of data use in a product team?
  • Which tools and apps are helpful for product teams? 

Q: Which members of product teams can benefit most from using data?

Data is helpful to each and every member of the product team. Using a data-driven approach will make it easier to understand your customers, analyze metrics and anomalies, prioritize features, and be objective about decisions.

Let’s dig deeper into different roles in product teams using data:

Gavin Deadman (Lead Product Manager, Betfair at Flutter Entertainment Plc)

As product designers and developers conduct experiments to validate the impact of a product change, it will be crucial for them to first make sure they can measure success and then monitor the data as it goes live. Otherwise, it will be impossible to understand the ROI and celebrate success.

Q: What are the key barriers to using data by all members of the product team in your experience? 

Data can help improve decision-making, gain competitive advantage, and transform the way the business operates. However, achieving these benefits can sometimes be challenging.

Based on PMs’ answers, product teams face three primary challenges to make their teammates use data:

  1. Building a data culture
  2. Consolidating data from different sources and making it accessible 
  3. Providing quality of data and training in data interpretation 
Gavin Deadman (Lead Product Manager, Betfair at Flutter Entertainment Plс)

All transactional, analytical, and qual data should ideally be in one tool, making it easy to access. Also, the speed of pulling the data is important. If data takes more than 10 seconds to load after each query it discourages people from using the tools.

Q: How did you overcome the barriers mentioned above? 

As a product manager you should break silos, create a data-driven culture, and encourage members of your team to learn and provide accessible data.

Here is what the product managers we spoke to recommend: 

Gavin Deadman (Lead Product Manager, Betfair at Flutter Entertainment Plс)

It’s helpful to prioritize the need to have front-end analytical data to connect to transactional data in one system and ask for updates weekly. Mentioning the impact helps to drive action.

Q: Can you share specific tactics that helped you increase the adoption of data use in your team?

There are some practices that can help product teams overcome the barriers to using data.

Our experts had the following key recommendations:

  • Ask right questions to uncover challenges you’re facing and generate better solutions
  • Use different KPIs to track the team and the product effectiveness and review core metrics on a regular basis
  • Encourage team members to share and discuss data
  • Set tools and processes for self-service data analysis
  • Lead by example in the workplace
Gavin Deadman (Lead Product Manager, Betfair at Flutter Entertainment Plс)

One of the best things which has helped the team use data more is asking better questions to drive action. What do users think when there are multiple design options to choose from? How can we measure success? How will we measure the impact of product development work once we go live? What are our product’s strengths and weaknesses in the market? What are our top-10 customer support queries and how can we reduce them? What data do we have to inform us that the proposed solution will likely solve the problem?

Q: Which tools and apps are helpful for product teams to increase data usage in decision making? 

Special tools and apps can help product teams use data to assess their development efforts, optimize performance, remove roadblocks, and increase customer satisfaction. Such instruments provide access to different types of data, and they have a modern infrastructure, high speed data access, and other capabilities.

The PMs we spoke to recommended these tools and apps for product teams to increase data usage in decision-making:

  • Tableau
  • Databricks
  • Snowflake
  • Excel or Google Sheets
  • Firebase 
  • Looker
  • Amplitude
  • Google Data Studio
Gavin Deadman (Lead Product Manager, Betfair at Flutter Entertainment Plс)

My favorite tool is Tableau. Its data visualization options and data access speed are fantastic if architected appropriately, and it’s quite easy to load different types of data from different sources whether from the transactional DB, Google Analytics, or qual data from surveys. I also like Firebase analytics for app performance. I’ve had experience with Looker, but I’ve found Tableau to be more effective in terms of speed of querying the data, ease of using the tool, and analyzing trends in the tool itself.”

I found this one to be a complex and slow read, but fascinating and very well timed – a couple of weeks before I started reading it I was introduced to the four stages of the competency model with unconscious and conscious playing a big part of it, then the following week I discussed with my coach the dynamics of conscious and unconscious thinking when answering questions. The following day and a chapter into the book I realised that there’s a whole book on this very subject, this book!

This book is full of case studies and experiments demonstrating the difference between thinking fast (unconscious (intuition (system 1))) and slow (conscious (more considered (system 2))) with the impacts that thinking fast has as it’s shaped by bias and what you’ve experienced, how unaware we are when we’re using system 1, but also how common it is.

Reflecting on the book it made me realise that there’s a deep connection with the psychology behind thinking fast and comprehending different approaches to solving complex problems – if you haven’t experienced a specific approach or method, it’s often an unknown unknown and only the current situation will be comprehensible (thinking fast state (bias, system 1)), with some common examples of inconceivable changes Waterfall to Agile, Project to Product Ownership, Command & Control to Servant-Leadership, Working Harder to Working Smarter, Building to Learning….it can be easy to judge that the reason for a current fixed approach is intentional, when actually it’s often an experience gap, so an effective way of influencing change is to empathise and speak up by asking great questions and being curious because the reason why something is like it is (archaic), is often because they haven’t experienced that difference and they just need a little help making the unknown a bit more known in an impactful way….making diversity and collaboration important in the workplace to get different points of views on the table.

This book by Melissa Perri gives a great view on what it takes to transform a business towards achieving sustainable growth by developing, optimising, and scaling the product organisation.

“Product managers connect the dots. They take input from customer research, expert information, market research, business direction, experiment results, and data analysis. Then they sift through and analyze that information using it to create a product vision that will help to further the company and to solve customer’ needs.”

“Product ownership is just a piece of product management.”

“You need the discipline to move toward organizing for products over projects. Companies that optimize their products to achieve value are called product-led organizations.”

“Product-led companies understand that the success of their products is the primary driver of growth and value for their company.”

“Having a strong product leader in the C-Suite is a critical step to becoming product-led. Unfortunately, there are not many CPOs available on the market at the moment.”

“Whenever I start a new training or workshop, I say to product managers, “Raise your hand if you went back and iterated in the last thing you shipped.” Normally, 15-20% of the people raise their hands. My next question is, “How do you know that what you shipped was successful?” The answer here usually revolve around meeting a deadline and finishing with bug-free code.”

A recommendation for anyone with ‘product’ in their job title, and CEOs.

This is the first time I’ve shared my mental health journey with anyone, so I’m grateful to Betfair / Flutter for giving me this opportunity to contribute to The Gameplan Podcast series on Mental Health.

This is by far the most dramatic book I’ve read on customer retention, but I really enjoyed it.

Even though the book is over 20 years old, the majority of content and principles are not only still relevant when it comes to customer service and customer experience for digital products, but also when collaborating with stakeholders as the book touches on the importance of telling people who have a problem to solve that you understand how they feel, empathising, listening…

I particularly enjoyed reading about Jeffrey Gitomer’s personal stories/learning experiences and the last chapter ‘Lessons you never learned in school (are the ones you need to succeed)’ is pure gold, full of practical tips on self-development which was totally unexpected.

“Satisfied customers will shop anyplace. Loyal customers will fight before they switch – and they proactively refer people to buy from you.”

“The CEO, or owner of your company does not pay you…the customer pays you.”

“No matter how much people pay, they expect a quality product. If you’re selling price and sacrificing quality, eventually you will lose the business to someone with opposite thinking.”

“The biggest reason that positive endings don’t happen is because employees are trained in policies and rules, rather than principles.”

“If you take ownership of the problems, you take ownership of the customer. If you let them go away, someone else is sure to take care of them that day – and for days beyond.”

On schooling..”I’m recommending we supplement the stuff that makes us excellent Trivial Pursuit and Jeopardy players (Geography, Literature, History), for the information and lessons we could really use (Attitude, Goals, Responsibility).”

“If these characteristics of successful people seem so simple, how come they’re so difficult to master? Answer: your lack of personal self-discipline and a dedication to life-long learning.”

After growing up using the LeSS framework, I’ve been looking forward to learning about #SAFe in detail and comparing it to some of the myths associated with it.

Myth busters of SAFe:
1. Waterfall milestones ❌️ Products governed by self-managing mission-focused agile teams; objective measures and milestones based on working solutions, delivering early and incrementally ✔️
2. People organised in functional silos and temporary project teams ❌️ People organised in value streams/agile teams; continuous value flow ✔️
3. Overly detailed business cases based on speculative ROI ❌️ Lean business cases with MVP, business outcome hypothesis, Agile forecasting and estimating ✔️
4. Doesn’t support Lean Startup principles/innovation ❌️ SAFe Lean Startup Cycle to support high levels of uncertainty using the build-measure-learn Lean startup cycle ✔️
5. It’s not Agile ❌️ Thinking Lean and embracing agility combine to make up a new management approach with a Lean-Agile mindset which aligns with the values and principles in the Agile manifesto ✔️
6. It doesn’t have any compelling principles ❌️ SAFe is based on a set of Lean-Agile principles ✔️:

1. Take an economic view; deliver early and often
2. Apply systems thinking
3. Assume variability; preserve options
4. Build incrementally with fast, integrated learning cycles
5. Base milestones on objective evaluation of working systems
6. Visualise and limit WIP, reduce batch sizes, and manage queue lengths
7. Apply cadence; synchronise with cross-domain planning
8. Unlock the motivation of knowledge workers
9. Decentralise decision-making
10. Organise around value

Case studies show, that many enterprises – large and small – are getting extraordinary business results from adopting SAFe eg.
• 10-50% happier, more motivated employees
• 30-75% faster time-to-market

I particularly enjoyed reading about how important a continuous learning culture is to SAFe:

“In a growth mindset, people believe that their most basic abilities can be developed through dedication and hard work – brains and talent are just the starting point. This view creates a love of learning and a resilience that is essential for great accomplishment.”

“Our mindsets are the foundation for achieving success and happiness in life. With the right mindset, anything is possible.”

“Leadership is responsible for driving change proactively by ‘taking a stand’ for a better future state.”

I’d definitely recommend this book, especially for those who want to get an overview of where the Product Manager/PO split comes from.

This is the most comprehensive book I’ve read on lean product development.

The thing I loved most about this read by Dan Olsen is how the techniques he exposes are relevant across the whole product life cycle, so for a new product entering a new market or an enterprise level business improving a mature product in a competitive market, making it applicable to use some of the techniques for identifying/solving problems on existing products.

The book is focused around a framework called The Product-Market Fit Pyramid and The Lean Product Process which consists of six steps:

1. Determine your target audience
2. Identify underserved customer needs
3. Define your value proposition
4. Specify your minimum viable product (MVP) feature set
5. Create your MVP prototype
6. Test your MVP with customers

The writing style makes it easy to digest and therefore easy to run gap analysis on your current ways of working to spot any improvement areas.

A recommended read for anyone interested in customer development, lean UX, design thinking, product management, user experience design, agile development, lean startup, or analytics.

Fascinating book full of stories about how athletes, scientists, inventors, technologists, teachers, and musicians have needed ‘range’ to succeed.

Having ‘range’ is essentially having a variety of different skills. David Epstein explains throughout the book that by experimenting across different experiences and sectors you’ll learn different skills along the way, helping you to develop range, which means you’re less susceptible to bias, more likely to find your true potential, and able to handle complex and unpredictable situations with more success.

It wasn’t an easy read, but a unique, thought-provoking and interesting one.

“…exposure to modern work with self-directed problem solving and nonrepetitive challenges was correlated with being ‘cognitively flexible’.”

“The more confident a learner is of their wrong answer, the better the information sticks when they subsequently learn the right answer. Tolerating big mistakes can create the best learning opportunities.”

“A person don’t know what he can do unless he tries. Trying things is the answer to find your talent.”

“Struggling to generate an answer in your own, even a wrong one, enhances subsequent learning. Socrates was apparently on to something when he forced pupils to generate answers rather than bestowing them. It requires the learner to intentionally sacrifice current performance for future benefit.”

“A jack of all trades is a master of none, but oftentimes better than a master of one.”

Marty Cagan, Partner at Silicon Valley Group gave a “Straight Talk on Product Ops” at the Lean Product Meetup in January followed by a fireside chat and Q&A.

Over 303 other product folk attended the live session wanting to hear from Marty about product ops.

Notes from the session:

  • So many companies define Product Ops differently
  • Some of the most toxic ones are taking off in some companies, important to raise the impacts so then it’s a conscious decision
  • “Product Ops operates differently at every company” – Product School, this statement is not that helpful, it’s different in every company, but some companies have similarities
  • We can’t even agree to decide what the common role of Product Manager is in the industry, so not surprised we’re in this situation with Product Ops
  • Like Dev Ops, Design Ops, people have thought cool we’re going to provide product managers with real tools to help Product get products into production quicker

More than 50 companies got in touch with their definition of how they use product ops:

  1. The Reincarnated PMO Model – product ops facilitate planning activities, they gatekeep all of the product requests – most damaging, not all that common
  2. The Two-in-a-Box PM Model – handles the day to day tasks involved with development – it’s like getting product executives to do the day to day tasks – 2nd most serious problem, splitting the product manager role from connecting customers, other areas of the business and engineers, last thing you want to do is cut that person in half, innovation goes right down, slicing the job in half is disempowered, more damaging than helpful
  3. The Delegated Product Leader Model – Product Ops ensures our PM’s learn the necessary skills and techniques needed to connect the dots between the activities of the various product teams – like a personal coach to the product managers, this is something the VP of product (head of product) should do 1:1 coaching from an experienced product leader
  4. The Production Operations Rebranding Model – Product Ops job starts when the product /feature launches making sure that things run smoothly, they’re helping more around customer service, more like customer success ops, not really focused on product, this definition isn’t a problem
  5. The Product Marketing Manager Rebranding Model – Product Ops covers two main activities: synthesizing ongoing customer feedback from sales, services and support (GTM strategy incl. beta and early release programs). This is due to politics if product marketing doesn’t have headcount but needs all this done. This method is a good thing and feels it is a good modern definition of Product Ops.
  6. The Force Multiplier Model – best one, really empowering product teams with Qual & Quant insights, product tools eg. roadmaping and best practices, would be better moved to this new Product ops team than buried in UX team – the problem is that companies are staffing this role definition with junior people, should be more like principle product manager level. So the structure should be:

CPO:

  • Product Management
  • Product Design
  • Product Ops – to empower product teams with Qual & Quant insights, tools and best practices

Nothing new in Product Ops from the different definitions, whilst The Force Multiplier Model isn’t new it’s well packaged and it came from Melissa from Escape the Build Trap. Solves the issue where UX have insights that no one does anything about. Puts the qual/quant insights squarely in product across all product managers – a more visible place where it has real value.

The two dangerous forces behind so many weak organizations:

  1. Scaling via Process rather than Leaders through people – SAFe is a good example of this
  2. Splitting the Product Manager Job – see 2nd definition above as an example, the product manager should focus on value and viability for the customer and not get involved in QA, design etc, there are people to handle this and the business should resource appropriately

Absolutely loved this read. In essence, Marty Cagan talks about the value of empowering product teams (several engineers, product manager, product designer) to serve customers with products that customers love, yet work for the business (by collaborating with stakeholders to come up with solutions that work). I particularly loved the fact that the majority of the book focused on coaching.

“Empowered product teams are all about giving teams hard problems to solve, and then giving them the space to solve them.”

“..this is really what I see in so many of the companies I visit. They have product teams that are more accurately feature teams, and they’re slaving away-pounding out features all day-but rarely getting closer to their desired outcomes.”

“Regardless of the reason for reviewing your topology, you should optimize for the empowerment of the teams by focusing on the dimensions of ownership, autonomy, and alignment.”

“Your highest-order contribution and responsibility as product manager is to make sure that what engineers are asked to build will be worth building. That it will deliver the necessary results.”

“Coaching is no longer a speciality; you cannot be a good manager without being a good coach.” – Bill Campbell

“Moving the product teams from the subservient feature team model to the collaborative empowered product team model begins with trust”

One of the most common situations/questions I was asked last year was around not having time to read books and “how on earth do you find time to read so many books?”, so I’ve published this article to help others wondering the same thing.

So how do I find time to read any books, let alone so many?

  1. We don’t have a tv at home, so there are fewer distractions.
  2. We don’t have any kids yet (although this might change this year).
  3. I make it a priority because I enjoy reading about other people’s experiences, the subject of books I read I have an interest/passion in, and learning from books make a positive impact on me personally and professionally.
  4. I only ever have one book in progress at a time, always have the next one lined up, and use an Amazon wish list to manage my backlog of books. Also, I only buy physical books, nice to escape from the screen and having a book lying around is a motivator to pick it up and read it.
  5. I seem to have a thirst for learning from books since I only started reading non-fiction books at the end of 2019 for the first time since leaving college over 20 years ago, so I’ve had a lot of practical experiences to make sense of and huge amounts of wisdom to learn from. Because of this, I tend to be able to relate to what a lot of books say, which helps me absorb the content easier and makes me feel immersed in the experience.
  6. Other people reading (especially my wife) and those that share their book reviews inspire me to read more.

It ultimately comes down to priority. Anyone can find time to read books if they make it a priority and reduce time on other activities they have less interest in. Also, as you start reading and experience the impact, you’ll naturally want to increase the priority of reading books and therefore find more time to read.

If you’re reading this article, the below books will get you off to a flying start:

  1. Indistractable by Nir Eyal
  2. The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle
  3. Atomic Habits by James Clear
  4. Unlimited Power by Anthony Robbins
  5. Making Ideas Happen by Scott Belsky

The majority of modern enterprise businesses now have a classic Scrum team setup (engineers and PO), but still wonder how they can respond to customer feedback quicker/more frequently, get ahead in the market, and innovate whilst protecting/growing revenue.

If you’re wondering this or generally interested in Agile, this book by Darrell Rigby is for you and will give you a very well balanced overview of what those next steps look like to unlock the benefits of Agile across the business, and introduces you to the concept of an Agile enterprise which allows bureaucracy and innovation efforts to coexist without the need for a big-bang approach.

An Agile enterprise involves creating Agile principles at every level starting from the top with an Agile leadership team, rather than just having an Agile tech team and the rest of the business bureaucratic. As a result, Agile Leadership is a big focus of the book and it dives into some starting points for principles:

– Employees learn by doing things themselves
– Trust is built over time
– Doing what only you can do makes everyone better off
– Customers are the best judges of what they want

To represent what a balanced approach could look like there’s a visual diagram showing an example of the agile enterprise operating model, which is fully customisable and “when you do it well, you create mission-inspired teams that work together across the organisation, both the run-the-business and the change-the-business elements”.

There’s plenty of inspiring success stories from Bosch, Amazon, Spotify and RBS too.

“More agile is not always better agile. There is an optimal range of agility for every business and for every activity within a business.”

“Genuine customer obsession sets a strong foundation for agility.”

View the book on Amazon here.

Here are some techniques to help you decide on what to read and do to improve:

1. Read a book that is relevant to a situation that you’re in now eg. Removing some bad habits, time management, reducing anxiety, understanding the full breadth of product management, levelling up your career, producing a product roadmap, putting together a product strategy, defining a compelling product vision, prioritisation, scaling a business from start-up, conducting customer interviews, improving soft skills, handling conflict, struggling to influence… and then try out the various tools or ideas you’ve learned in the book. Reading a book that is relevant to your current situation will likely help you absorb the content easier too, enabling you to extract even more value from it. There is a book for every situation nowadays, just search on Amazon and you’ll be surprised at what you find.

2. Conduct basic gap analysis in your knowledge/skills and read books on the gaps, then try out the ideas you’ve been exposed to. A performance review at work/feedback from colleagues is also a good source of insight on what to focus on.

3. Validate some of the nonsense you might be experiencing. If you’re experiencing a situation that seems a bit bonkers or you’re wondering whether there could be a more effective way of doing things, read a book with good recommendations that are always backed up by thorough analysis and then read some more similar books on the subject to further validate or increase your knowledge in the area. If several high profile authors are saying similar things and you’re experiencing the opposite, it’ll give you the confidence to question existing ways and in time help steer the ship in a more successful direction.

Now, if you’ve not got that opportunity at work to build up some practical experience of what you’ve learned (eg. If you haven’t got the autonomy or someone else does it) do it on the side or in your own time as an example/exercise and get feedback internally at work or from a mentor which will produce an extra benefit of being seen as being proactive and showing initiative. If you’re in an unhealthy culture where you’re not given room to experiment on your learnings, it’s likely time to seek haven in a more healthy culture.

On the other hand, if you’ve spotted a gap where something isn’t being done which you’re not directly responsible for, step up and try and fill that gap yourself whether it’s roadmapping, making a feature backlog more visible to stakeholders, market analysis, value stream mapping, reduce waste…

If you still aren’t sure where to start, the below books in that order should help get you off to a flying start:

  1. Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle
  2. Start With Why by Simon Sinek
  3. Atomic Habits by James Clear
  4. Unlimited Power by Anthony Robbins
  5. The Mindset of Success by Jo Owen
  6. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey
  7. Indistractable by Nir Eyal

As Sarah Wood says in her book Stepping Up “the most important thing is that you get started, as quickly as possible. Done is better than perfect!” which also applies to both reading and doing.

Top 3 reads which made the biggest impact:

1. The Mindset of Success by Jo Owen

“The most important mindset for a successful career is learning and growth. If you stay still, you will fail.”

2. The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle

Once you’ve made the journey into the Now, you will no longer have problems (only situations) as nothing exists outside of the Now.

3. Stepping Up by Sarah Wood

What makes a good leader has changed over time, from being a dominant personality and didactic style to having leadership qualities of courage, kindness, trust, authenticity and empathy.

Thanks to all of the authors for sharing their wisdom, and thanks to my connections for sharing their book recommendations and inspiring learning experiences throughout the year.

Hope everyone has a nice festive break and a great learning experience next year.

Enjoyed this read by Scott Belsky where he uncovers a pragmatic set of techniques to help organise, prioritise and execute actions turning high aspirational goals into reality, gives tips on collaborating with other people to help accelerate progress, and provides good insight into effective leadership and self-leadership methods.

“Genius is 1 percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration”

“To push your ideas to fruition, you must develop the capacity to endure, and even thrive, as you traverse the project plateau.”

“Making ideas happen boils down to self-discipline and the ways in which you take action.”

“Even when the next step is unclear, the best way to figure it out is to take some incremental action. Constant motion is the key to execution.”

“Nothing will assist your ideas more than a team of people who possess real initiative.”

A practical short read on how to properly talk to customers and learn from them by Rob Fitz.

Whilst the book focuses on validating new product/business ideas, many principles Rob talks about still apply to existing products, enabling you to understand how and why customers are using the product in the way they are and how they feel about the product vs. competitors – building up qualitative data about the UX.

Even though the book was published 8 years ago, it’s still relevant and I loved how the book focuses on having an informal chat with customers about their feelings and why first, before diving into getting feedback on solutions which you’d do in future conversations – how can you satisfy customers if you don’t understand them first. Also, with remote customer interview tools now available like User Zoom, Lookback and User Testing, it makes it easier more than ever to talk to customers weekly.

The Mom Test:

1. Talk about their life (or how/why they use the product in the way they do) instead of your idea
2. Ask about specifics in the past instead of generics or opinions about the future
3. Talk less and listen more

It’s called The Mom Test because it leads to questions that even your parents can’t lie to you about.

Link here to the book on Amazon.

It’s also a great companion to Lean Customer Development by Cindy Alvarez.

Most books touch the surface of what it takes to achieve high aspirational goals, but The Messy Middle by Scott Belsky gives a comprehensive insight into what it really takes to reach them and long-term success, covering the highs and lows of the journey built on seven years’ of research.

You read in books and the news new venture kickoffs with inspiring missions and the big celebratory achievements giving a sense it’s quick and easy to reach them, whether it’s funding, IPO, market-leader status, job role…when in reality it’s not and instead takes relentless patience, grit and empathy to achieve long-term success which is the focus throughout the book.

The book is structured well keeping to around two pages on each subject, where Scott gets right to the point and focuses on modern approaches to help build and optimise your team and improve yourself.

“Milestones that are directly correlated with progress are more effective motivators than anything else.”

“The only ‘sustainable competitive advantage’ in business is self-awareness.”

“Don’t start to question your gut solely because it is different. Nothing should resonate more loudly than your own intuition. The truly differentiating factors of your project are the ones most likely to be different, misunderstood, or underestimated by everyone else.”

“Every leader needs to come up for air now and then. By temporarily disconnecting from your journey, you’re able to take perspective of all the moving parts.” – very relevant as I read this on holiday.

A fantastic read which I’d recommend to anyone struggling to progress towards their missions, looking to make sense of their experiences or generally interested in learning from Scott’s journey and wisdom.