Archive for the ‘Recruitment’ Category

If you’re a product owner, associate product manager or product manager wanting to understand the full breadth of the product manager role, I’ve put together a generic product manager job description, so that gap analysis can be done to learn and gain experience in your knowledge gaps, which will set you up for success in the world of product management.

It’s unlikely that you will be provided with guidance or training on the full breadth of the product manager role and it’s up to you to proactively fill in your knowledge gap by testing and learning new ways of working with your product, reading books and being curious by collaborating with different areas of the business to find out more about the customer, their role and product performance.

About the role:

The Product Manager will join the product management team and take the pivotal role of managing their product line and its outcome on the customer and business.

The candidate will manage the entire product life-cycle across their product line to solve customer and/or business problems using Agile and Lean principles, by collaborating with their cross-functional team (which also includes a product designer and several engineers), as well as key stakeholders including other product managers across other product lines, BI, commercial, operations, marketing, brand, customer support and legal / compliance teams – the Product Manager is at the heart of the business, so building strong relationships and having good communication skills is important.

The Product Manager is expected to:

  • Define, manage and share the vision, missions, KPI’s, strategies and roadmap for their product line.
  • Own and manage the product backlog, so that the highest priority PBI’s are ready to be solved / validated with a PRD / hypothesis.
  • Manage all aspects of in-life products for their product line, including customer feedback, requirements, and issues.
  • Proactively collect and analyse qualitative and quantitative data to aid prioritisation and to explain why the problem is worth solving.
  • Have a deep understanding of customers by talking to customers and customer support frequently.
  • Collaborate with marketing to continually grow the product.
  • Discover new ideas / problems in collaboration with stakeholders.
  • Drive action across the business to get time sensitive product iterations to market on time.
  • Review how time to market can be reduced across their product line using Lean principles.
  • Manage stakeholder expectations when there are multiple constraints.
  • Adapt to change quickly and creatively find ways to validate ideas with customers in a Lean way.
  • Proactively remove any impediments from getting the value from idea to the customer.
  • Clearly describe what problem we need to solve, the value and customer flows to the development teams and stakeholders.
  • Dynamically switch from live support / BAU to long term strategy on a day-to-day basis.
  • Monitor product performance daily and communicate wins across the business.
  • Monitor and research the market to understand competitor SWOT.
  • Present product performance to senior stakeholders quarterly.
  • Create and share a product delivery update every two weeks.
  • Be the player and use the product frequently including user acceptance testing.
  • Line manage and mentor associate product managers.

Overall

  • Embracing their product line knowledge and effectively sharing with other team members and stakeholders.
  • Evangelising their product.
  • Striving to make progress towards their KPI goals everyday.
  • Leading the go to market (GTM) strategy within Agile methodologies.
  • Focusing on outcomes rather than outputs.
  • Accountable for the success of their product line.

Position Qualification & Experience Requirements

  • Passionate about solving customer problems.
  • Proactive with stakeholder engagement.
  • Proven track record of managing all aspects of a successful product.
  • Strong time management and organisational skills.
  • Experience with Scrum, Kanban and Lean principles and methods.
  • Strong problem solving skills and willingness to roll up one’s sleeves to get the job done.
  • Will give exemplary attention to detail and have excellent communication skills.
  • Is creative with an analytical approach and can easily switch between creative and analytical work.
  • Outgoing, positive and forward thinking.
  • Excellent communicator of product updates, trends, priority and the rationale behind them.
  • Have an obsession with creating great products with your team that customers love.
  • Has a high EQ.
  • Become the voice of the customer – be an expert on quantitative and qualitative insights.
  • Experience with tools such as Tableau, Aha!, Google Analytics, Mixpanel, Jira, Confluence, Lucidchart, Firebase or other equivalent tools.

Product Owner is a job role that came out of Agile and Scrum, and although many organisations use it as a job title that is interchangeable with Product Manager, it’s not correct. In Scrum the Product Owner is defined as the person who is responsible for creating PBI’s and grooming the backlog, in Agile it was defined as the representative of the business, and neither entirely describe the full breadth of a Product Manager’s responsibilities, some of which includes:

  • Defining, managing and sharing the vision, KPIs, strategies and roadmap for their product line.
  • Spending time talking to. customers weekly to build up qualitative data.
  • Discovering opportunities by collecting and analysing quantitative data.
  • Understanding the marketplace.

Product Owner is a role you play in an Agile team, whereas a Product Manager is the job title of someone responsible for a product and its outcome on the customer and the business.

Now a lot of Product Owners out there are great Product Managers, and they should just change their title. But a fair number of Product Owners have simply completed a certified Scrum product owner course and are told to just get on with managing the development backlog, which sets them up to fail as they never consider the broader role. So if you’re tasking a Product Owner with the broader product management responsibilities, make sure you provide the training they need to master the full breadth of the role (and then change their title).

The structure of the product organisation and culture also has a bearing on whether you have the autonomy to fulfil the Product Manager job. When using Agile / Lean methods it should be the Agile team (Product Manager, Product Designer and Dev team) who make the key product decisions / trade offs, instead it can often be held centrally at a senior management level, where multiple Product Managers / Owners are assigned random projects from a roadmap to just execute which is a more Waterfall / Project Management approach. Those who find themselves in this situation should find haven in a more empowered/Agile/product led organisation which will accelerate their learning and understanding of the full breadth of the Product Manager job.

If a product is to be sustainable, tech fit, compliant and competitive it needs to have a short and long term development capacity strategy which will help to ultimately deliver the product vision.

Not having enough capacity could mean spending months / years only focusing on upgrading software versions / maintaining legacy technology or meeting regulatory requirements – not making any significant progress on getting after the product vision or surpassing competitors, having too much resource could mean that another product in the business could deliver a higher return with that resource instead, but having the right amout of capacity is important.

The product having the right amount of capacity should mean it’s possible to get after low hanging fruit, maintaining current tech whilst also concurrently getting after the next generation technology (product vision), meeting security / compliance requirements and having resource to experiment.

Understanding what the right amount of capacity should be isn’t easy, but a capacity planner will be able to help. A capacity planner should ideally be driven by points and velocity, so that no matter where the feature is on the feature pipeline (received a high level t-shirt size or has been broken down into stories) it’s possible to easily update the capacity planner with a more accurate estimate as the feature goes into development.

The data you’d typically need to lay out in a spreadsheet in order to effectively capacity plan includes:

  • Date (by month)
  • Team velocity – ‘Points to Allocate to Features’ (which already takes into account average sickness, holidays, ceremonies, breaks, training etc)
  • Forecast of future velocity based on an increase / decrease in capacity eg. Are you planning on adding another team to the product in 4 months time?
  • List of features
  • Estimates (in story points) against each feature
  • Priority order of features
  • ‘Points Remaining’ which is calculated as you start filling up the spreadsheet

It’s totally possible to roughly estimate future features by dev sprints, team sprints or man days instead of points as long as you convert it back to points after knowing how many points a whole team burns each sprint (velocity).

Another reason why it’s essential to have a capacity planner is that based on when features start and finish on the plan will drive the product roadmap dates making the roadmap data driven.

Having a capacity planner available is also a handy report when demonstrating to stakeholders that when features are in the correct priority order and once capacity has run out for a given month, then there’s no more room to slip in anymore work and it’s a case of being patient or changing priority / increasing capacity.

Greener

There will always be an endless list of all kinds of problems for a business to solve and it’s how people come together to solve the problems which accelerates the execution of viable solutions and positive changes.

Some problems will be easier to solve than others, there will be a multitude of lengthy conversations about how to solve certain problems and there will be various opinions on the value of the problem to solve, but it’s important to respect the person responsible (and accountable) for solving the particular problem and rather than moan about things not being solved / done how you’d expect, then use influence, positivity and collaboration instead to see how things could look from a different perspective, because ultimately everyone’s heading for the same goal and would be passionate to solve problems in the most effective way.

It’s also not easy to ignore a process which you seem to have various problems with especially when it’s not a priority to solve for the person who’s responsibility it is making you feel frustrated, but you could try rewiring your brain to obsess about problems which are within your remit to solve or contribute to solving instead and when asked by senior management “what improvements do you think we can make outside of your remit?” then you’re totally within your right to give an honest answer along with what you’ve tried to do to help.

Before you jump ship because you think the grass is greener, have you thought about:

  1. Collaborating on the solution with the person directly whose responsibility it is to solve the problem in a positive way – you never know, the person who’s responsibility it is to handle the process with the particular problem at hand could do with your observations or opinion on how to overcome the problems they’re facing
  2. Obsessing about solving problems which you’re responsible for and reviewing whether you’re fulfilling all of your R&R, as not solving your own problems could have a direct impact on other areas trying to solve their own problems
  3. Discussing openly with your line manager about how they think you could help contribute to solving the problem
  4. Is it a valuable problem to solve relative to other problems across the business
  5. Listing out all of the positive and good things about the company
  6. How lucky you actually are
  7. Making more conversations
  8. How much autonomy you already have to make big changes

When you get approached with an attractive offer by a recruiter or are fed up of certain problems not being solved, have a real think about how you’ve made an effort to help solve the problem by collaborating, because you may find the same problems if not more might exist on the other side of the fence, resulting in being in the same position in six months time with your new company.

The Product Group London

If you’re a Product Owner or Product Manager and would like to participate in a variety of interesting product focused discussions, then The Product Group London is for you.

It’s also an opportunity to meet, interact and network with those in a similar role who solve similar problems and have similar challenges.

At the monthly meetups there’s normally a topic of the night and a featured product which gets discussed. For example, the July 2018 agenda was:

  1. Topic of the Night: Developing the role of product management – how do you develop the role of product management in organisations that either (1) have no formal product function, (2) have a product function that is not realising its potential, or (3) have a well-established function and need to develop it to the next level?
  2. Featured Product: Clear Review – Stuart Hearn, Founder & CEO

You can also:

Team-image

There’s no doubt that it’s desirable for a team to be happy for many obvious reasons including productivity, but a few do’s and don’ts to retain a jolly happy team ☺:
Do

  • Be polite irrelevant of who you’re talking to – thank you, I appreciate that, thanks
  • Offer help if you see a colleague struggling
  • We have done that – embrace the team
  • Congratulate your colleagues on achievements
  • Share any positive performance off the back of effort
  • Own up / apologise for contributing to buggering anything up accidently
  • Be positive day to day
  • Be honest sooner rather than later so people have time to improve
  • Chill and take time out to talk non-shop to your colleagues
  • Discuss / focus on what problems you’re looking to solve
  • Ask why it’s valuable
  • Allow autonomy

Don’t

  • Blame a work colleague directly but instead discuss whos responsibility it is and how we can avoid it in future
  • Dictate solutions to colleagues. discuss the problem and how you need help solving it instead. Troops will stand by and support you whatever the need
  • There’s absolutely no need or nothing to gain from being rude or a bully, other than your work colleagues keeping their distance from you. You can always get what you want from being polite and direct.
  • Focus on problems with agreed solutions (negativity)
  • There’s no I in team
  • Contradict yourself regularly to avoid confusion and frustration

This may all be obvious, but get it wrong and there could be an expensive mass exodus which will impact productivity, but adopting at least a few of these will result in Spartans banging their swords against their shields ready to defend the realm with you.

image

Since the rise of bid optimising / RTB there’s been more of an appetite for advertisers to seriously consider taking the digital media planning and buying function in-house, for many reasons whether cost savings or the function being closer to product.

Due to this, there’s been a shift in why and where people change jobs within the digital media industry.

Neil Middlemass’s recruitment consultancy ran a survey recently asking the burning key questions (below) to industry specialists resulting in the truth about moving in house being revealed.

The Headlines
Why does everyone want to move in-house?
Career
Do client-side roles pay more?
Will working client-side improve my career progression?
Is it easier to diversify your channel exposure in-house?
Are agency acquired skills valued higher than in-house skills?
What draws senior agency people in-house?
Hiring
What are the benefits of employing agency people into in-house roles?
Working Mechanics
Do you have more influence and control working in-house?
Is client-side work too far away from the action?
Is it easier to get campaigns signed off in-house?
Is it more difficult to stay up to date with the market in-house?
Lifestyle
Is the work/life balance better in-house?
How does the social life at work differ?
Where are in-house roles based?
Working Environment
How does the working culture differ in-house compared to agency?
Do you have to work harder at an agency?
How target-driven are in-house roles and how is success measured?
Are the offices more or less impressive client-side?
How big are in-house teams compared to agency side?
How much does the vertical the company works in affect the culture of the company?
Conclusions?
After speaking to everyone, what did I learn?

Conversion1

Neil’s Recruitment have recently posted a fantastic Paid Search resource guide for grads, 1st / 2nd jobbers and those who are keen to know more about the ins and outs of paid search advertising.

The Paid Search guide which can be accessed here includes:

  • The conversion funnel
  • What is paid search aka PPC & where does it fit in
  • Basics
  • Free training webinar
  • Blogs & trade press
  • Things to research / understand
  • Glossary

It’s good to see recruitment companies like this going the extra mile to educate those who are new to digital advertising, which also clearly shows they themselves have a deep understanding on the subject.

Resource guide
Neil’s Recruitment have come up with some handy tips for writing your cover letter, honing your CV and helping you stand out in an interview:

NRC_RTB_V1-2

Neil’s Recruitment have recently posted a fantastic RTB resource guide for grads, 1st / 2nd jobbers and those who are keen to know more about what RTB is along with all those other 3 letter acronyms.

The RTB guide which can be accessed here includes:

  • What is RTB
  • Free training webinar
  • Blogs and trade press
  • Things to research/understand
  • Excel tips
  • Maths practice
  • Glossary

It’s good to see recruitment companies like this going the extra mile to educate those who are new to digital advertising, which also clearly shows they themselves have a deep understanding on the subject.

wpid-kids-and-moneyjpg-77598d70108ac633_large-um8nwy.jpg

As digital media skills become more valuable to the industry and there’s a huge lack of them in certain areas, some grads in their first job in marketing / advertising are demanding an extra £20k pay rise in the first 18 months of starting work.

This causes many issues especially ad agencies when it comes to managing retention. iProspect are a good example of how agencies have had to adapt by adopting a quarterly pay review rather than annual.

With these ludicrous demands at such an early stage in their career, minimal work experience and a lack of key skills which is required to be able to think for themselves, have the confidence or knowledge to improve campaign performance independently and generally still at the stage where they’re sitting at their desk wondering ‘what to do next’ is causing a level of ungratefulness and sense that there could be greater long term benefit / ROI to businesses by scrapping a grad only policy and accepting school leavers as a priority in some cases.

The right school leaver may not be able to string along words as grammatically correct and might require a calculator more often than grads, but what they do bring to the table is an abundance of common sense, drive, passion for their job, ability to get things done in a proactive way with less moaning and more doing , all of which are only normally naturally gained when working full time from the age of 16-18.

Let’s face it, we all know that you don’t need to be a rocket science to work in marketing / advertising and for those grads who think that all that’s required in our industry to get significant auto payrises is a degree and to turn up for work, really do need to wake up and smell the coffee because the industry is a fairly close nit industry and those who put the effort in will shine and those who expect an easy ride will be quickly identified.

Just because a degree is missing from a CV, employers should think twice before discounting the applicant.

Neil’s recruitment blog touches on school leavers in digital media nicely.