Posts Tagged ‘Technology’

Bubble: Bitcoin (Crypto) becoming a mainstream payment method and that Crypto is decentralised.

Revolution: Private blockchains used to improve supply chain efficiency for businesses and Crypto being a viable investment, as well as used as a payment method for large/international transactions.

Walmart used IBM’s Food Trust private blockchain to improve the efficiency of their supply chain making over a hundred thousand-fold speed improvement from farm to Walmart. Microsoft with the Xbox also made significant efficiency gains by implementing the same private blockchain strategy to improve the royalty settlement and new publisher flows.

Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services, Oracle, Google Cloud and IBM already offer private blockchain solutions.

Zynga, Etsy, Microsoft, Burger King, KFC, Virgin, Expedia and many others already accept Bitcoin payments.

The stock exchange industry could save $20 billion from blockchain-based clearing.

There is 1 in 66 billion trillion chance of someone mining a block (which is used to validate transactions and receive a Bitcoin reward for their effort).

Whilst only 21 million Bitcoins will ever be available (3 million left to mine), each Bitcoin is equal to 100 million Satoshis, with a Satoshi being the minimum amount you can exchange, making it an investment for everyone.

To verify a single Bitcoin transaction uses enough electricity to power an average household for 22 days and generates the same carbon footprint as over 750,000 Visa transactions.

In order to mine, you need a mining farm (a set of super computers) which are primarily owned by a small group of people that are employed and funded by a single company. Also China owns 80% of the market for Bitcoin mining hardware which is being integrated with the monetary system, adopted by banks, and regulated by governments…so not so decentralised.

Bitcoin can only process about 3 transactions per second, Ethereum 15 per second and Visa 45,000 per second.

To send $10 from US to Indonesia it’s impossible via bank transfer, costs $30 via UPS and only costs $1 via Bitcoin. To send $10k the fee is $400 via bank transfer, $150 via UPS and still only $1 via Bitcoin. In fact, it would still be just $1 fee via Bitcoin if you was to send $10m whereas the fee via bank transfer would be $400k.

Crypto exchanges already support KYC and AML regulations, making it  ready for iGaming and other highly regulated industries.

“The two biggest use cases for crypto going forwards will be payment methods (primarily for large or international transfers) and investments (supplementing, but not replacing, stocks and bonds).”

In this book, Neel Mehta, 🚀 Adi Agashe and 📍 Parth Detroja break down this highly complex set of tech into a digestible, balanced and comprehensive guide, which I’d recommend to anyone who doesn’t know about the benefits, challenges and future of blockchain and cryptocurrencies.

Lastly it was nice to hear that the creator (Satoshi) of this innovative tech is a fellow Brit.

CSPO

Whether you’re a product led organisation or keen to take product ownership to the next level, a good way to ensure that Product Owners are well equiped to effectively handle their product in an agile environment is through various Product Owner Certifications.

The first level of certification is becoming a Certified Scrum Product Owner, where the course is typically over a two day period with modules including:

  • Introductions to Agile and Scrum
  • Agile Basics
  • Scrum Basics
  • Roles and responsibilities
  • Team Chartering (Ready, ‘Done’ and Team agreements)
  • Product Visions
  • Product Roadmaps
  • User Stories
  • The Product Backlog and Product Backlog Refinement
  • Agile Estimating and Planning
  • Sprints
  • Participant-Driven Q&A

Acspo

Once you’ve become a Certified Scrum Product Owner and you want to take product ownership to the next level then attend the Advanced Certified Scrum Product Owner® course which includes:

  • Product Backlog Prioritisation & Refinement
  • User Stories
  • Rapid Vision Generation
  • Roadmapping That Works
  • Value Proposition Design
  • Hypothesis Testing
  • Use Cases
  • Getting to Done
  • In-person Collaboration
  • On-line Collaboration with Weave
  • Understanding Yourself as a Product Owner
  • Lift-off for Agile Teams
  • Scaling Scrum and other Agile processes
  • Extreme Programming
  • Facilitative Listening I & II
  • Inclusive Solutions

Csppo

The final step is becoming a Certified Scrum Professional Product Owner. Certified Scrum Professionals challenge their teams to improve the way Scrum and other Agile techniques are applied. They have demonstrated experience, documented training, and proven knowledge in the art of Scrum.

Are you ready for the next level of experience and expertise in the art of Scrum? If so, it’s time to elevate your career further by earning the CSP®credential.

Once a product is mature and the product roadmap is filled up with valuable product iterations, it’s likely that the CPO will be keen to find out how some of the most valuable customer problems can be delivered sooner.

Having to balance customer problems, marketing, technology improvements, technical debt, regulatory, security, bugs and dev ops requirements with only one development team would make this extremely difficult, as there’s little room to work on all of these different types of work concurrently eg. customer problems concurrently with the more technical driven requirements.

To work on different sets of requirements concurrently, the product would need to scale which would involve adding additional product development teams to the product line. With more development teams working on the product would also require additional firepower from the technical architect and product manager role if delivery is to remain efficient and ROI positive.

An example of how you can scale the product manager role across multiple development teams who are working on the same product line:

Chief Product Officer (CPO)

  • Responsible for ensuring that the Product Managers are handling their product lines effectively
  • Handling the high level product strategy across all product lines

Senior Product Manager / Lead Product Manager of the Product Line

  • Market analysis
  • Competitor analysis
  • Customer analysis
  • Trends
  • Product line strategy
  • Product Vision
  • Product Roadmap
  • Backlog prioritisation
  • Epic / feature scoping
  • Backlog grooming
  • Sprint planning

Product Manager / Associate Product Manager working with the Development Team

  • Contributing to the product vision and roadmap
  • Customer analysis
  • Epic breakdown
  • Requirement workshops
  • User story definition
  • Detailed acceptance criteria
  • Backlog grooming
  • Sprint planning
  • Acceptance of user stories
  • Retrospectives
  • Daily stand-up

The Associate Product Manager could also be referred to as Feature Product Manager, Junior Product Manager, Product Executive or Business Analyst.

In order for the Senior/Lead Product Manager to be able to focus on the product vision, prioritisation of the product backlog and product strategy to ensure the product remains competitive, it’s important that when adding additional development teams to the product that they get additional product manager support to help them out with the more tactical day to day activities, as you can see from the split in tasks above – Product Line Managers handling more strategic tasks especially prioritisation in all instances and the Associate Product Manager handles more tactical tasks.

Spreading a product manager too thin with little support could result in a lack of focus on both product strategy and getting product backlog items delivered in an efficient way.

Communication

With more communication methods available at your disposal, it makes good communication easier now more than ever.

With face to face, email, chat message services, presentation formats, video conference calls and agile software among some of the key forms of communicating, there’s no excuse for either not communicating effectively or causing delays to delivering value to customers due to a lack of communication.

Let’s look at these communication methods in more detail and an effective way of using each:

  1. Face to face – preferred and ideal method at any given opportunity as you can often get the details you need in a single conversation avoiding email tennis and it’s a great way to collaborate easily. Also it builds positive intimate relationships which is incredibly important, so try as much as possible to escape from your desk / technology and pop over to speak to them face to face
  2. Email – great way of providing status updates to various people / distribution lists in one hit. Try to avoid email tennis though and relentless conversations especially if the person sits close by as it’ll help avoid spam to others! It’s essential to have a good email handle process to avoid missing important emails also
  3. Chat Messenger Services (Slack) – fantastic way of collaborating in an efficient way quickly. Have a quick question, want to share a document or link to a group of people or team, working remotely and want to join the conversation or simply chat quickly whilst you’re at your desk, then Slack is a great solution. When a new project kicks off, having a Slack group setup makes collaborating even easier. Also it’s developer friendly
  4. Presentations – lots of people don’t read all of their emails or have an organised email process to avoid missing emails, so gathering up a group of people to give a face to face presentation of information is a great way to get your message across in a neat and visual way. Also it gives an opportunity for some good questions to be asked and you can be more confident that the audience listens vs. sending the information out through a different communication method and it getting ignored
  5. Video conference calls (Skype for Business) – this makes collaborating with external companies, another division abroad or someone working from home easy, simple and effective
  6. Agile software (JIRA) – add everyone who’s interested in the relevant work item as a watcher allowing for development updates to be automated. Adding comments and tagging individuals in is an effective way of getting an answer or communicating also

It’s not just about communication, it’s about effective communication and there’s plenty of opportunity to use the right method at the right time to achieve this.

wasting-money-300x183

Criteo have certainly become popular over the past few years with marketers. This is mainly due to them being sold into a no hassle site remarketing solution paying on a low risk CPC basis.

What a lot of marketers and CEOs don’t know is that by using a managed site retargeting service like Criteo is not only lazy and inefficient, but it it’s also opening the business to data leakage which could have a damaging effect.

Let’s break those three key points down further:

1. Inefficient way of spending money – Criteo typically charge c 50p CPC yet using a DSP eg. MediaMath and Adacado together, the eCPC rate would be c 5p. Everything works back to an eCPM for display, so on a CTR of 1.5% you’re paying £5 CPM for the managed service via Criteo and only c 70p CPM for the media and dynamic creative service both on a self-service basis. Not only that, 1.5% is quite conservative for a dynamic remarketing CTR so as it goes up, so does Criteo’s eCPM.

2. Lazy – it’s a lot easier to send a monthly invoice to accounts to pay but it does take a bit more intelligence, will power and proactiveness to get a self-service DSP on board and dynamic creative supplier. Display CRM would only be part of someone’s job and they’d typically apply a tight frequency cap and low CPM at the top of the funnel, but as you go lower in the funnel the frequency cap should be increased alongside the CPM as the users become more valuable to your business.

3. Data leakage – allowing a third party to ‘manage’ your data for you is always risky that it could fall in the wrong hands eg. a competitor or data exchange.

Something I haven’t mentioned is scale and volume, although Criteo do have a few exclusive publishers, this doesn’t match to any degree the sheer scale which a DSP such as MediaMath or DoubleClick Bid Manager bring to the table.

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