How to know what to read and do

Posted: Dec 28, 2021 in Guides
Tags: , ,

Here are some techniques to help you decide on what to read and do to improve:

1. Read a book that is relevant to a situation that you’re in now eg. Removing some bad habits, time management, reducing anxiety, understanding the full breadth of product management, levelling up your career, producing a product roadmap, putting together a product strategy, defining a compelling product vision, prioritisation, scaling a business from start-up, conducting customer interviews, improving soft skills, handling conflict, struggling to influence… and then try out the various tools or ideas you’ve learned in the book. Reading a book that is relevant to your current situation will likely help you absorb the content easier too, enabling you to extract even more value from it. There is a book for every situation nowadays, just search on Amazon and you’ll be surprised at what you find.

2. Conduct basic gap analysis in your knowledge/skills and read books on the gaps, then try out the ideas you’ve been exposed to. A performance review at work/feedback from colleagues is also a good source of insight on what to focus on.

3. Validate some of the nonsense you might be experiencing. If you’re experiencing a situation that seems a bit bonkers or you’re wondering whether there could be a more effective way of doing things, read a book with good recommendations that are always backed up by thorough analysis and then read some more similar books on the subject to further validate or increase your knowledge in the area. If several high profile authors are saying similar things and you’re experiencing the opposite, it’ll give you the confidence to question existing ways and in time help steer the ship in a more successful direction.

Now, if you’ve not got that opportunity at work to build up some practical experience of what you’ve learned (eg. If you haven’t got the autonomy or someone else does it) do it on the side or in your own time as an example/exercise and get feedback internally at work or from a mentor which will produce an extra benefit of being seen as being proactive and showing initiative. If you’re in an unhealthy culture where you’re not given room to experiment on your learnings, it’s likely time to seek haven in a more healthy culture.

On the other hand, if you’ve spotted a gap where something isn’t being done which you’re not directly responsible for, step up and try and fill that gap yourself whether it’s roadmapping, making a feature backlog more visible to stakeholders, market analysis, value stream mapping, reduce waste…

If you still aren’t sure where to start, the below books in that order should help get you off to a flying start:

  1. Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle
  2. Start With Why by Simon Sinek
  3. Atomic Habits by James Clear
  4. Unlimited Power by Anthony Robbins
  5. The Mindset of Success by Jo Owen
  6. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey
  7. Indistractable by Nir Eyal

As Sarah Wood says in her book Stepping Up “the most important thing is that you get started, as quickly as possible. Done is better than perfect!โ€ which also applies to both reading and doing.

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