Posts Tagged ‘Psychology’

“85% of job success comes from well-developed people skills.”

“70% of team issues are caused by people skills deficiencies.”

It’s becoming increasingly more common for Product Management and therefore product managers – who are generalists – to sit at the centre of the business surrounded by specialists, making collaboration with everyone in your team and stakeholders across the business a fundamental part of the job in order to manage the product and product business effectively. How you handle these relationships will contribute significantly to the success of the product and your role as a product manager.

Human Powered by Trenton Moss will give you a better understanding of yourself, increase your empathy to help forge better relationships and provide you with the tools you need to inspire those around you, setting you and your product up for success.

Throughout the book, there are short realistic stories with characters as examples to explain situations and resolutions making them easy to digest and relate to.

They don’t teach you how to handle conflict at school, but Trenton does a great job of setting out a framework to help you resolve conflict. The book covers 5 other key areas, with a framework for each including:

1. Conflict resolution
2. Strong relationships
3. Leading and influencing
4. Facilitation
5. Storytelling
6. Outbound comms

For me, the first three areas made the most impact, and I can definitely see the frameworks and advice useful for the final three chapters for those needing tips on ways of improving in those areas.

I’d recommend this book for all product directors and product managers/owners.

EQ is the new IQ!

You can order the book here: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1781336067/ref=cm_sw_r_apan_glt_fabc_4ZFMT00SGSVD473E0K56

Excited to have received an early copy of Human Powered by Trenton Moss.

Psychology and Product Management are my favourite subjects, so I’m really looking forward to reading this book which combines them both.

Product managers are generalists and require support across the business from specialists in every area making EI skills important to have when working in Product Management. Demand for high EI skills will grow significantly over the next decade, especially as it becomes even more common for businesses to put Product Management at the heart of their organisation, so it’s great to see books like this addressing the skills gap.

Review of the book to follow over the next 2-3 weeks!

More info on the book: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1781336067/ref=cm_sw_r_apan_glt_fabc_E7C7NMM41NDZDYYX3FCG

Rewiring your brain to avoid your mind crippling your energy as it obsesses about past or future events is difficult, but it is absolutely possible, and this book makes it much easier.

It gives you tools on how to do it written in an easy to understand question-and-answer format to show you how you can silence these thoughts and use that energy more practically.

Essentially once you’ve made the journey into the Now, you will no longer have problems (only situations) as nothing exists outside of the Now. It is here you will find joy, are able to embrace your true self, and feel comfortable in the present.

“The energy form that lies behind hostility and attack finds the presence of love absolutely intolerable”.

Over 7 million people have read this book, it’s a best seller on Amazon, and I can understand why.

Loved this book!

The way Yu-kai Chou has combined the game mechanics and behavioural psychology components to create the Octalysis Gamification Design Framework is remarkable.

The book gives a thorough overview of how you can optimise the below 8 core drivers of Gamification with Human-Focused Design to create engaging and successful experiences in your product, workplace, marketing, and personal lives.

  1. Epic Meaning & Calling
  2. Development & Accomplishment
  3. Empowerment of Creativity & Feedback
  4. Ownership & Possession
  5. Social Influence & Relatedness
  6. Scarcity & Impatience
  7. Unpredictability & Curiosity
  8. Loss & Avoidance

It reminded me of how commonly used gamification mechanics are outside of games, when my RunKeeper app told me that my last run at the weekend was my 34th fastest – a reminder I need to get out more!

The book categorises the 8 core drivers into White Hat and Black Hat techniques and explains the benefit of cultures where people are intrinsically motivated rather than extrinsically.

An enjoyable learning experience and a recommended read.

Incredible book by Robert Cialdini which includes ~50 amazing experiments from psychologists around influence, as well as a great selection of experiences which Robert has been through himself.

I found the most fascinating chapter was around reciprocation, because it explains why those who naturally give/help others out in a selfless way, get more successful outcomes in the long run than those who don’t. Very relevant in business especially for roles involving Agile, product management, marketing and of course sales.

The book also covers Commitment and Consistency, Social Proof, Liking, Authority and Scarcity

If you’re into psychology, I’d recommend this book.

Anxious

Anxiety disorders are very common. In a survey covering Great Britain, 1 in 6 adults had experienced some form of ‘neurotic health problem’ in the previous week. The most common neurotic disorders were anxiety and depressive disorders. More than 1 in 10 people are likely to have a ‘disabling anxiety disorder’ at some stage in their life.

Anxiety gives you a feeling of worry, nervousness, or unease about something which has an uncertain outcome, but some tools make it possible for you to rewire your brain allowing a more calm, healthy and rational way of thinking instead, but being self-aware is also an important part of being able to achieve this.

Example of some of the common scenarios which cause anxiety:

One way of reducing the unease about your uncertain outcomes is to fill up a to-do list with ‘certain‘ outcomes, covering both personal and work items which will keep your mind busy the majority of the time on these achievable items. As your mind knows that they’re achievable it will naturally allow your brain to focus more on positive thoughts (rewiring your anxious brain), leaving the items on the list above still on your mind, but approaching the scenarios will be more natural and rational as you’ll be more confident rather than your head spinning for days.

By creating these to-do lists of small achievable items whether it’s on your phone through an app like Notes, email or physical notepad you’ll find that not only will you start getting a positive feeling of progression as you tick them off each day (which replaces some of the anxious thoughts), but you’ll also find that your productivity will increase as you’re spending less time procrastinating, unnecessarily worrying about things which are often outside of your control or a scenario which will never happen.

To-do lists can be as little or as big as you like for example:

  • Anything you need to do at work
  • Review your R&R for work and if there’s anything you’re not doing, then add those to your list
  • DIY projects
  • Food shopping
  • Blog posts
  • Setting up meetings
  • Sending out reports
  • Contacting friends or family
  • Items to purchase next
  • Hobbies
  • Fitness eg. Booking golf
  • Watching a film
  • Talking to someone at work about something
  • Sending an email
  • List of work objectives
  • Friends/family birthday
  • Your children’s after school activities
  • Researching and learning

It’s important not to feel pressured to get everything on the to-do list done in one day and rather than set a deadline for it all, just prioritise it and slowly go through it when you have time.

Another tool is to write down some positive affirmations, referring back to the relevant ones often by having them up around the house or in a visible place, which can often put your mind at ease.

Thinking ‘what will be will be’ is easier said than done, but try something different to get your mind thinking in a different/positive way and you may find yourself naturally thinking ‘what will be will be’ for something which you had major anxiety over before.