Posts Tagged ‘Teamwork’

Most books touch the surface of what it takes to achieve high aspirational goals, but The Messy Middle by Scott Belsky gives a comprehensive insight into what it really takes to reach them and long-term success, covering the highs and lows of the journey built on seven years’ of research.

You read in books and the news new venture kickoffs with inspiring missions and the big celebratory achievements giving a sense it’s quick and easy to reach them, whether it’s funding, IPO, market-leader status, job role…when in reality it’s not and instead takes relentless patience, grit and empathy to achieve long-term success which is the focus throughout the book.

The book is structured well keeping to around two pages on each subject, where Scott gets right to the point and focuses on modern approaches to help build and optimise your team and improve yourself.

“Milestones that are directly correlated with progress are more effective motivators than anything else.”

“The only ‘sustainable competitive advantage’ in business is self-awareness.”

“Don’t start to question your gut solely because it is different. Nothing should resonate more loudly than your own intuition. The truly differentiating factors of your project are the ones most likely to be different, misunderstood, or underestimated by everyone else.”

“Every leader needs to come up for air now and then. By temporarily disconnecting from your journey, you’re able to take perspective of all the moving parts.” – very relevant as I read this on holiday.

A fantastic read which I’d recommend to anyone struggling to progress towards their missions, looking to make sense of their experiences or generally interested in learning from Scott’s journey and wisdom.

Working smarter, not harder is the essence of this book. Dan tells tons of stories of how people have efficiently achieved their personal and professional goals by collaborating with other people and feeling comfortable about asking for help, rather than just going it alone in a silo.

People helping you with your high aspirations will also give you more freedom to relax, recover, do hobbies…which is important as Dan explains only “16 percent of creative insight happens while you’re at work. Instead, ideas generally come while you’re at home or in transit, or during recreational activity.”

Dan covers teamwork and leadership in detail talking about his winning formula of autonomy + goal/vision clarity + regular feedback = high performing teams.

“It all starts by setting a goal, a new bigger version of your own future. Then your next step is to ask, ‘Who can help me do this?'”

If you need some tips on how to reach bigger goals or you want to avoid procrastination, this is the book for you.

Heart beat

In order to get an idea (problem) to a customer (solution) there can be as many as 5-8 different levels / key roles to play from Developer to Product Manager and to get the idea delivered in an efficient and effective way, it’s important that everyone plays their part and gets stuck in.

One way of ensuring that you’re delivering real value by playing a part in the idea to customer flow is by providing regular heartbeat updates to your peers and stakeholders.

Dependent on the role you play, will depend on the type of heartbeat update you’d send out:

  • Developers – all that’s required from a developer (or QA) is to update the agile software tool eg. JIRA on a daily basis which will automate any type of report eg. Sprint burndowns, sprint delivery report for the Scrum Master and Product Manager
  • Scrum Master / Team Lead – fortnightly release update on in flight product iterations (epics), risks to delivery and mitigations to be sent to peers, Development Manager and Product Manager
  • Development Manager – monthly update on delivery efficiency improvements, development recruitment and strategy to deliver upcoming product iterations to be sent to peers, Product Manager, Technical Architect and head of development
  • Technical Architect – monthly update on technical architecture solutions for upcoming product iterations and quarterly presentation on architecture vision to Stakeholders, Development Teams, Product Manager and head of department
  • Product Manager – fortnightly sprint review and sprint goals report, bi-monthly update on what product iterations are up next with a product roadmap update and finally a quarterly presentation on what value has been delivered, what’s up next and an update on the product vision. The majority of updates to Stakeholders, Development Teams, Technical Architect, Directors, CTO and head of development

Once you’ve mastered the format of your updates, actually changing the content shouldn’t take long at all, so it’s easy to send out your heartbeat updates on time, but by not sending out any updates could easily give the indication that you’re a passenger on the idea to customer flow.

Team-image

There’s no doubt that it’s desirable for a team to be happy for many obvious reasons including productivity, but a few do’s and don’ts to retain a jolly happy team ☺:
Do

  • Be polite irrelevant of who you’re talking to – thank you, I appreciate that, thanks
  • Offer help if you see a colleague struggling
  • We have done that – embrace the team
  • Congratulate your colleagues on achievements
  • Share any positive performance off the back of effort
  • Own up / apologise for contributing to buggering anything up accidently
  • Be positive day to day
  • Be honest sooner rather than later so people have time to improve
  • Chill and take time out to talk non-shop to your colleagues
  • Discuss / focus on what problems you’re looking to solve
  • Ask why it’s valuable
  • Allow autonomy

Don’t

  • Blame a work colleague directly but instead discuss whos responsibility it is and how we can avoid it in future
  • Dictate solutions to colleagues. discuss the problem and how you need help solving it instead. Troops will stand by and support you whatever the need
  • There’s absolutely no need or nothing to gain from being rude or a bully, other than your work colleagues keeping their distance from you. You can always get what you want from being polite and direct.
  • Focus on problems with agreed solutions (negativity)
  • There’s no I in team
  • Contradict yourself regularly to avoid confusion and frustration

This may all be obvious, but get it wrong and there could be an expensive mass exodus which will impact productivity, but adopting at least a few of these will result in Spartans banging their swords against their shields ready to defend the realm with you.