Posts Tagged ‘Solutions’

Greener

There will always be an endless list of all kinds of problems for a business to solve and it’s how people come together to solve the problems which accelerates the execution of viable solutions and positive changes.

Some problems will be easier to solve than others, there will be a multitude of lengthy conversations about how to solve certain problems and there will be various opinions on the value of the problem to solve, but it’s important to respect the person responsible (and accountable) for solving the particular problem and rather than moan about things not being solved / done how you’d expect, then use influence, positivity and collaboration instead to see how things could look from a different perspective, because ultimately everyone’s heading for the same goal and would be passionate to solve problems in the most effective way.

It’s also not easy to ignore a process which you seem to have various problems with especially when it’s not a priority to solve for the person who’s responsibility it is making you feel frustrated, but you could try rewiring your brain to obsess about problems which are within your remit to solve or contribute to solving instead and when asked by senior management “what improvements do you think we can make outside of your remit?” then you’re totally within your right to give an honest answer along with what you’ve tried to do to help.

Before you jump ship because you think the grass is greener, have you thought about:

  1. Collaborating on the solution with the person directly whose responsibility it is to solve the problem in a positive way – you never know, the person who’s responsibility it is to handle the process with the particular problem at hand could do with your observations or opinion on how to overcome the problems they’re facing
  2. Obsessing about solving problems which you’re responsible for and reviewing whether you’re fulfilling all of your R&R, as not solving your own problems could have a direct impact on other areas trying to solve their own problems
  3. Discussing openly with your line manager about how they think you could help contribute to solving the problem
  4. Is it a valuable problem to solve relative to other problems across the business
  5. Listing out all of the positive and good things about the company
  6. How lucky you actually are
  7. Making more conversations
  8. How much autonomy you already have to make big changes

When you get approached with an attractive offer by a recruiter or are fed up of certain problems not being solved, have a real think about how you’ve made an effort to help solve the problem by collaborating, because you may find the same problems if not more might exist on the other side of the fence, resulting in being in the same position in six months time with your new company.