Posts Tagged ‘Positivity’

Anxious

Anxiety disorders are very common. In a survey covering Great Britain, 1 in 6 adults had experienced some form of ‘neurotic health problem’ in the previous week. The most common neurotic disorders were anxiety and depressive disorders. More than 1 in 10 people are likely to have a ‘disabling anxiety disorder’ at some stage in their life.

Anxiety gives you a feeling of worry, nervousness, or unease about something with an uncertain outcome, but there are tools (different tools work for different people) which make it possible for you to rewire your brain allowing a more calm, healthy and rational way of thinking instead, but being self-aware is also an important part of being able to achieve this.

Example of some of the common scenarios which causes anxiety:

I mentioned earlier that anxiety gives you an unease about something with an ‘uncertain‘ outcome, but one way of reducing this unease about your uncertain outcomes is to fill up a to do list with ‘certain‘ outcomes, covering both personal and work items which will keep your mind busy the majority of the time on the achievable items. As your mind knows that they’re achievable it will naturally allow your brain to focus more on positive thoughts (rewiring your anxious brain), leaving the items on the list above still on your mind, but approaching the scenarios will be more natural and rational as you’ll be more confident rather than your head spinning for days.

By creating these to do lists of small achievable items whether it’s on your phone through an app like Notes, email or physical notepad you’ll find that not only will you start getting a positive feeling of progression as you tick them off each day (which replaces some of the anxious thoughts), but you’ll also find that your productivity will increase as you’re spending less time procrastinating, unnecessarily worrying about things which are often outside of your control or scenario outcomes which will never happen.

To do lists can be as little or as big as you like for example:

  • Anything you need to do at work
  • Review your R&R for work and if there’s anything you’re not doing, then add those to your list
  • DIY projects
  • Food shopping
  • Blog posts
  • Setting up meetings
  • Sending out reports
  • Contacting friends or family
  • Items to purchase next
  • Hobbies
  • Fitness eg. Booking golf
  • Watching a film
  • Talking to someone at work about something
  • Sending an email
  • List of work objectives
  • Friends / family birthday
  • Your children’s after school activities
  • Researching and learning

It’s important not to feel pressured to get everything on the to do list done in one day and rather than set a deadline for it all, just prioritise it and slowly go through it as an when you have time.

Another tool is to write down some positive affirmations, referring back to the relevant ones often by having them up around the house or in a visible place, which can often put your mind at ease also.

Saying “what will be will be” is easier said than done, but try something different to get your mind thinking in a different positive way and you may find yourself telling other people “what will be will be” for something which you had major anxiety over before.

Greener

There will always be an endless list of all kinds of problems for a business to solve and it’s how people come together to solve the problems which accelerates the execution of viable solutions and positive changes.

Some problems will be easier to solve than others, there will be a multitude of lengthy conversations about how to solve certain problems and there will be various opinions on the value of the problem to solve, but it’s important to respect the person responsible (and accountable) for solving the particular problem and rather than moan about things not being solved / done how you’d expect, then use influence, positivity and collaboration instead to see how things could look from a different perspective, because ultimately everyone’s heading for the same goal and would be passionate to solve problems in the most effective way.

It’s also not easy to ignore a process which you seem to have various problems with especially when it’s not a priority to solve for the person who’s responsibility it is making you feel frustrated, but you could try rewiring your brain to obsess about problems which are within your remit to solve or contribute to solving instead and when asked by senior management “what improvements do you think we can make outside of your remit?” then you’re totally within your right to give an honest answer along with what you’ve tried to do to help.

Before you jump ship because you think the grass is greener, have you thought about:

  1. Collaborating on the solution with the person directly whose responsibility it is to solve the problem in a positive way – you never know, the person who’s responsibility it is to handle the process with the particular problem at hand could do with your observations or opinion on how to overcome the problems they’re facing
  2. Obsessing about solving problems which you’re responsible for and reviewing whether you’re fulfilling all of your R&R, as not solving your own problems could have a direct impact on other areas trying to solve their own problems
  3. Discussing openly with your line manager about how they think you could help contribute to solving the problem
  4. Is it a valuable problem to solve relative to other problems across the business
  5. Listing out all of the positive and good things about the company
  6. How lucky you actually are
  7. Making more conversations
  8. How much autonomy you already have to make big changes

When you get approached with an attractive offer by a recruiter or are fed up of certain problems not being solved, have a real think about how you’ve made an effort to help solve the problem by collaborating, because you may find the same problems if not more might exist on the other side of the fence, resulting in being in the same position in six months time with your new company.

Positive and collaboration image

Product Management (Product Owners / Product Managers) typically have a very broad range of responsibilities as they’re quite often seen to be the avenue to ensure not only that ‘things get done’ when it comes to product delivery, but also that the right things get done.

The size of the business and location of departments can determine what you do day to day, for example a small company a product manager might see themselves fulfilling the role of a marketer, data analyst or developer team lead on top of their product management role, but in a larger organisation who typically handle all operations in-house might see themselves promoting the vision, providing context, prioritisation and collaborating with the different departments to get things done. Lastly you could be in the unfortunate position where you have the developers in one country, the marketers in another and further more the product management team in another country which makes collaboration all the more challenging.

Product specialists are expected to be well rounded across a multitude of disciplines including KPIs / handling data, prioritisation (effort vs. value), customer service, UX, technical, marketing, Agile and of course product life cycle, but being a specialist in all these areas is unrealistic, so it’s fundamental to closely collaborate with all areas of the business in order to get to the right solution to customers within an acceptable time frame.

Unlike a dictatorship, collaborating on what problems to solve is critical generating a positive atmosphere, so discussing the problem you’re hoping to solve and solutions openly and honestly with stakeholders and relevant business areas, enables you all to come to a decision together with the customer being at the heart of conversations which will result in delivering a far superior product / end result.

This actually applies to the majority of roles, but collaboration alone is not enough and it’s equally important to be positive with a ‘can do’ attitude which will likely be absorbed across the ranks, resulting in your fellow colleagues who you rely on so much will rally behind you to fast track solutions to your customers.

Letting the barriers down, lots of collaboration, positivity, understanding there’s no I in team, believing that you can’t do everything on your own and appreciating the support at your disposal will naturally put you on the right road to success.