Posts Tagged ‘Management’

After 17 years of researching leaders around the world, Jo Owen shares the secret sauce to what a successful mindset looks like at different leadership levels and how you can unleash it.

Seven mindsets that consistently came out of the research which the book focuses on:

1. High aspirations
2. Courage
3. Resilience
4. Positive
5. Accountable
6. Collaborative
7. Growth

This is the best book I’ve read on management and leadership as it compares the different mindsets you need across each leadership level, allowing you to build a crystal clear picture of what mindset you need to focus on to get to the next level of your leadership journey.

Owen includes a multitude of tables, with the most impactful showing how the nature of leadership and management changes at each stage of a career, along with what mindset you need at each stage and details of behaviours/expectations. This makes it easy to find the gaps allowing you to make an immediate impact on your mindset.

The book is packed with advice on how to get the most out of yourself and your team along with some common pitfalls for example:

• High aspirations: should not be about self – focus on the mission and gain buy-in from the team.
• The prison of performance: focus on learning, not just achievements.
• Positive thinking: ensure it doesn’t crowd out reality.
• Leadership: it’s not about authority, power or position, but taking people where they wouldn’t have got by themselves.

“High aspirations will accelerate your career: you will succeed fast or fail fast. More likely, you will fail several times, learn from your setbacks and then succeed to a greater extent than anyone thought possible.”

To paraphrase Charles Darwin: “It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but rather the one most adaptable to change.”

This book will help you make sense out of the nonsense you might experience, and give you insight that will help you to accelerate your learning and career.

“The most important mindset for a successful career is learning and growth. If you stay still, you will fail.”

This book was a fascinating read where Grove talks about how he pulled off the greatest transformation in the history of Intel: moving from the memory business to microprocessors more than a decade after its founding.

During his tenure at Intel Corporation, he described the different reorganisations that the company went through, with the only one which was effective – which just about every large company or enterprise that he knew was organised was in a hybrid form, which consisted of mission-oriented departments. This reminding me of product lines.

Although it was published over 25 years ago, the management practices are timeless, where Grove touches on the negative impact of ‘managerial meddling’ (disempowerment) and he talks about productivity, work simplification and leverage with the goal to work smarter, not harder!

As Grove says “..the single most important sentence of this book: The output of a manager is the output of the organisation units under his or her supervision or influence”.

The key to survival is to learn to add more value, which is ultimately what this book is about.

A classic book on management, which I’d recommend.

Seeing content by Gary Vaynerchuk for a while now driven by passion and authenticity, I thought his book would be a good read and I wasn’t disappointed.

Like a lot of his content, he gives an authentic and passionate insight into what it takes to achieve your full potential and goals in life.

The book is loaded with questions he’s been asked over the years where he responds with concised authentic answers, with enough context to make you feel inspired and motivated.

“Pumping everyone full of confidence makes for a more creative, risk-taking environment.”

“Passion is an unmatched fuel”

“Maybe we all look for excuses to explain why we don’t achieve what we want to, and we should be more self-aware and recognize how much control we actually have over our own fate…it’s amazing how as soon as you make the shift from “I can’t” to “Why can’t I?” you go from defense to offense, and as everyone knows, the best place to score is always on offense.”

“The only effective way to truly lead is to practice and model the behaviour you want to see in others…the top has to ensure that its values, beliefs, and attitudes trickle down to shape the culture and encourage a productive, innovative, creative, and even happy environment.”