Posts Tagged ‘Google’

seo_sign

For decades purchasing more back links in high volume and on-site content has been top of the agenda for agencies.

Things have changed as Google focuses more on bespoke popular content for the individual which is reflected in their algorithm.

Rather than agencies finding the most effective illegitimate way of manipulating Google’s algorithm, they are now forced to work closer than ever in a more genuine way with brands / content marketers in order to achieve higher rankings in the SERPs focusing on:

  • META details – title tag will always remain a crucial part of rankings.
  • On-site content incl. homepage and sections.
  • Creating and supporting a forum which will help domain authority.
  • Social plugins especially G+ across the whole site.
  • Quality link building through PR’s.
  • Blog strategy – working closely with bloggers.
  • Adopting an omni-channel strategy / responsive web design.
  • Site speed across all devices.
  • Minimising use of flash or any other un-friendly search media.

For years the channel has had to remain in the ‘unknown’ as agencies couldn’t communicate the illegitimate practices, but it’s good to see that the natural / organic search channel can finally sit side by side with other marketing channels.

I’m sure there are plenty of further algorithmic updates from Google in the pipeline to reward those who are genuine and the industry will embrace these with open arms.

truth_and_lies_t

Acquiring customers through brand paid search is in most cases not only the most cost efficient way of acquiring customers, but it’s also where most brands find where their most valuable customers originate from.

As Facebook and Twitter release more ad opportunities by the week which are meeting advertiser demands and paid search CPCs increase especially across mobile, SEM specialists are finding it increasingly difficult to add value or are just simply missing the limelight and therefore to combat this in some cases when presenting paid search performance, they are mixing in brand search data with generics without splitting them out to make ‘search’ look better.

This is just plain wrong. No matter how much the CEO or CMO likes the look of positive data especially through internal campaign tracked activity, as a media specialist they should be advising key stakeholders of the difference between both, letting them know that there’s no need to obsess around brand search performance because knowing what drives brand search is outside the SEM specialist remit and is a wider and bigger question / concern.

A CEO or CMO asking an SEM specialist to increase brand search volume and constantly saying that “paid search drives the most conversions” than any other channel and that paid search should be given more budget (when brand and generics isn’t split out) is bad for business.

I know that a lot of consultants and CMO’s are under pressure but there needs to be more effort from the SEM specialist and senior management team to understand what is driving search performance, splitting out generic and brand keywords clearly and focusing on driving incremental generic conversions leaving brand search volumes for another day.

I’ve heard a lot of moaning and read a lot of articles (example here) about display specialists adding remarketing data into prospecting results and the fact that it needs to crack down, but not splitting out brand and generic search results is far worse and equally shambolic.

There is an argument to have brand search data held in a completely different system to be used purely for online and offline brand attribution / to view halo effect, but what is clear is that brand and generic search data should never be mixed up on the same line and should always be kept separate.

SEM specialists and consultants should be obsessing about how to improve generic paid search performance whether it’s ad copy performance or building long term strategies on building up their QS to achieve lower CPCs in the future and higher rankings which will in turn increase volume incrementally.

There’s a time and a place to discuss brand search performance and it shouldn’t be when comparing overall digital channel by channel performance.

Quantilus_finance

The search is over and the best DSP on the planet has been found.

Taking into account global resource, data centre locations, commercials, minimum spends, targeting options, QPS, UI, reporting, sources plugged in, a list of the top DSPs has been put together.

MediaMath have a good combination of most key elements such as internal expertise for advance setups, they tap into all sources as a priority so they have the most reach available out of all DSPs and have an advanced algorithm that does what it says on the tin. They are also flexible on the commercials allowing you to build your volume up overtime with little risk. This strategy also gives you an idea of the kind of client service they provide which is at an exceptional level.

DoubleClick Bid Manager have certainly improved since moving onto the Google stack tapping into more sources than ever. They still cannot tap into FBX though and are locked out from certain publishers due to being under the ‘Google’ umbrella. As you’d expect, they do have the most superior QPS which is certainly an advantage when it comes to display CRM.

Turn were very slow getting a data centre in Europe and they have a long way to go but they are still a very respectable DSP.

1
MediaMath
2
DoubleClick Bid Manager
3
Turn
4
AppNexus
5
DataXu
6
[x+1]
7
LucidMedia