Posts Tagged ‘Customer experience’

This is by far the most dramatic book I’ve read on customer retention, but I really enjoyed it.

Even though the book is over 20 years old, the majority of content and principles are not only still relevant when it comes to customer service and customer experience for digital products, but also when collaborating with stakeholders as the book touches on the importance of telling people who have a problem to solve that you understand how they feel, empathising, listening…

I particularly enjoyed reading about Jeffrey Gitomer’s personal stories/learning experiences and the last chapter ‘Lessons you never learned in school (are the ones you need to succeed)’ is pure gold, full of practical tips on self-development which was totally unexpected.

“Satisfied customers will shop anyplace. Loyal customers will fight before they switch – and they proactively refer people to buy from you.”

“The CEO, or owner of your company does not pay you…the customer pays you.”

“No matter how much people pay, they expect a quality product. If you’re selling price and sacrificing quality, eventually you will lose the business to someone with opposite thinking.”

“The biggest reason that positive endings don’t happen is because employees are trained in policies and rules, rather than principles.”

“If you take ownership of the problems, you take ownership of the customer. If you let them go away, someone else is sure to take care of them that day – and for days beyond.”

On schooling..”I’m recommending we supplement the stuff that makes us excellent Trivial Pursuit and Jeopardy players (Geography, Literature, History), for the information and lessons we could really use (Attitude, Goals, Responsibility).”

“If these characteristics of successful people seem so simple, how come they’re so difficult to master? Answer: your lack of personal self-discipline and a dedication to life-long learning.”

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When you look at any of the top brands which are currently doing well in this economic crisis, they are likely to have many things in common such as customer service levels, responding to customer demand promptly and delivering a high quality customer experience no matter how you engage with their brand.

Customers are more savvy than ever and will simply not stand for bad service, not being clear with promotional Ts&Cs and a bad user journey / experience.

Many CEO’s still ignore and turn their backs on their high value customer feedback, customer complaints, competitor improvements and general customer demand yet wonder why their competitors are stealing more and more market share.

Due to how technology has evolved over the past few years, this has forced brands to adopt an omni-channel strategy rather than a cross-channel strategy. Omni-channel is a one unified brand experience no matter how or where you engage with the brand. Some examples of what this does and doesn’t look like:

  • You see a product in store which isn’t available online – not omni-channel.
  • You start a car insurance quote on desktop and finish it on your mobile – is omni-channel.
  • You play poker on desktop but key features are missing from the mobile app – not omni-channel.
  • You receive a coupon through the post which is only available to use in store – not omni-channel.
  • You get a very warm customer feel in store and also get a very thorough warm response over the phone – is omni-channel.
  • You thought you’d upgrade your TV sat package online and after a few months decide to downgrade no matter what, but you can only downgrade over the phone – not omni-channel.

It won’t be cheap to adopt an omni-channel strategy, it won’t be an easy ride and it’s certainly not a short term strategy, but if you want the new generation of customers to engage and stay loyal to your brand, then you need to adapt.

Fortunately there are consultants already out there who can offer good advice like Webcredible and IVIS Group.