Posts Tagged ‘Consequences’

Learning

There are three major types of learning:

  1. Learning through association – Classical Conditioning
  2. Learning through consequences – Operant Conditioning
  3. Learning through observation – Modeling/Observational Learning

This article is focusing around No2 (learning through consequences) and the reason for focusing on this is because it’s so popular for fellow work colleagues across any business to recognise a problem / something not getting done and the consequences of not solving / doing it, that they just get stuck in and solve it themselves because they’re passionate about the business they work for instead of leaving it for the person whose responsibility it is to solve the problem / complete the task with risk that it’ll likely not get done.

Now, many people would say that’s brilliant team work and a fantastic ‘One Team’ attitude, but actually the action of solving someone else’s problem / completing a task for them is stopping the actual person whose responsibility it is to do it from learning. Also there’s the point about the person should be doing what they’re paid to do, but most importantly unless people experience the consequences of not doing elements of their job, then they’re simply not going to learn the importance of doing that element of the job and that they need to perhaps adjust their processes or admin to ensure they take control of their responsibilities in future.

Like I said at the start, if you’re passionate about delivering value for the business then it’s certainly not easy to avoid getting stuck in and it’s hard to avoid reminding people to do their job, but if you want to achieve the goal of the person who should be solving the problem or doing the task actually does it as expected in future, then the only way this will happen in the long run is by that person recognising the consequences of it not being done, so then they can avoid leaving it in future.

There will naturally be times when someone is clearly over worked and can do with a hand and that’s where you could come in to help, but if it’s someone close by spending most of their time surfing the net or playing ping pong in the games room, then you need to take a step back, try and ignore the problem not getting solved allowing them to deal with it however they feel is effective, but what is for certain is that problems / processes don’t normally get done on their own.