Posts Tagged ‘books’

A fascinating read by Thomas M. Siebel where he writes about how enterprise digital transformation powered by cloud computing, big data, AI and IoT (Internet of Things) has caused mass extinction and mass diversification in the business world…..

PwC’s 2017 study projects an increase of $15.7 trillion in global GDP by 2030 due to AI.

Analysts expect IoT will contribute up to $11.1 trillion in annual global economic value by 2025.

Industry analysts estimate that the AI software market will exceed $250 billion by 2025.

A nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack would disable the vulnerable US power grid for years with only 1 in 10 Americans surviving after one year.

My experience with digital transformation is to always start from problems to solve (use cases) / business value rather than diving into ‘data lakes’ which could swallow up years of resource with minimal business value.

Great read by Marty Cagan which covers the entire Product Management area.

Whilst a significant amount of the book is focused on the importance of solving customer problems – outcomes over outputs, which is the theme of a lot of product books around, there are 67 chapters covering:

> The different growth stages of tech companies, lessons and some really good success stories from Product Managers of Google, Adobe, BBC, Microsoft, Netflix and Apple
> The challenges and the reality of being a Product Manager
> The different roles of the Product/Agile team, supporting roles and additional leadership roles needed as you scale
> Tons of advice about product vision strategy and KPIs
> Huge amounts of discovery and transformation techniques
> Stakeholder management

And it also accurately describes the top reasons for loss of innovation and loss of velocity.

Incredible book by Robert Cialdini which includes ~50 amazing experiments from psychologists around influence, as well as a great selection of experiences which Robert has been through himself.

I found the most fascinating chapter was around reciprocation, because it explains why those who naturally give/help others out in a selfless way, get more successful outcomes in the long run than those who don’t. Very relevant in business especially for roles involving Agile, product management, marketing and of course sales.

The book also covers Commitment and Consistency, Social Proof, Liking, Authority and Scarcity

If you’re into psychology, I’d recommend this book.

This was a good read by Terry Schmidt, with some fantastic practical tools such as the LogFrame used for strategic product planning, which also generates a hypothesis.

A good alternative to the VMOST framework.