The most common Agile framework is Scrum, which typically involves a product manager managing a backlog of user stories (outputs) using the user story framework:

Template

As a… <persona>

I want… <intent>

So that… <benefit>

Example

As a player

I want to be able to easily access new games

So that I can have fun playing the latest games that I haven’t played before


Since user stories are output-focused rather than outcome-focused, it becomes easy to fall into the build trap of delivering output after output with no understanding of whether it delivered any value to the customer or business. One of the reasons is that unless tracking is part of the DoD, to track the value would often require additional tracking user stories in the product backlog which are easily ignored when in a project led environment or when there is pressure to get after delivering a new unrelated user story (output).

Now, In the 1920s, Ronald Fisher developed the theory behind the p value and Jerzy Neyman and Egon Pearson developed the theory of hypothesis testing, which as a result formed an Agile/Lean technique called Hypothesis-Driven Product Development which is outcome-focused, delivers a measurable conclusion and enables continued learning. A hypothesis framework consists of:

Template

We believe… <capability>

Will result in… <outcome>

As measured by… <KPI>

Example 1

We believe that by providing players with an easy way to access new games

Will result in an increase in game plays

As measured by a higher number of game plays per player and new game engagement

Example 2

We believe that by offering new players a 5 day achievement-based promotion

Will result in new players retaining longer

As measured by a decrease in churn rate by 5%


The immediate benefit of using a hypothesis-driven framework especially for uncertain product iterations is that the product team are forced to ensure that the outcome is measurable before delivering the output/feature. Since it will be measurable, it will be possible to learn and validate the hypothesis aka validated learning.

The ideal scenario would be to run multiple experiments concurrently to reach the same outcome so that you can learn quicker (rapid experimentation). A test failing means progress, that you’ve learned what doesn’t work, so you can progress in a positive way to experiment on a different idea to solve the problem.

It’s easy to migrate from the Scrum to Kanban framework or vice versa, but migrating to the hypothesis-driven framework is significantly more challenging as it involves a culture of empowerment and learning, with trust and patience being critical elements to start with whilst the team gets used to the new framework, data structure and the validation capabilities, which is needed before the product team can conduct rapid experiments effectively.

If you are entering a mature market and you are more certain that the solutions will solve the problem, a standard user story is more appropriate, but the most efficient way of delivering outcomes where you are uncertain that the solution will solve the problem is hypothesis-driven product development, rather than spending months guessing with user stories without any learning.

With tools available to easily conduct remote customer interviews (UserZoom, Lookback.io), A/B testing (Firebase, Maxymiser) and prototyping (Sketch, Figma), it makes it easier more than ever for empowered product teams to efficiently conduct experiments to validate that the solution will solve the problem.

Good luck in your experimentation journey!

Bubble: Bitcoin (Crypto) becoming a mainstream payment method and that Crypto is decentralised.

Revolution: Private blockchains used to improve supply chain efficiency for businesses and Crypto being a viable investment, as well as used as a payment method for large/international transactions.

Walmart used IBM’s Food Trust private blockchain to improve the efficiency of their supply chain making over a hundred thousand-fold speed improvement from farm to Walmart. Microsoft with the Xbox also made significant efficiency gains by implementing the same private blockchain strategy to improve the royalty settlement and new publisher flows.

Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services, Oracle, Google Cloud and IBM already offer private blockchain solutions.

Zynga, Etsy, Microsoft, Burger King, KFC, Virgin, Expedia and many others already accept Bitcoin payments.

The stock exchange industry could save $20 billion from blockchain-based clearing.

There is 1 in 66 billion trillion chance of someone mining a block (which is used to validate transactions and receive a Bitcoin reward for their effort).

Whilst only 21 million Bitcoins will ever be available (3 million left to mine), each Bitcoin is equal to 100 million Satoshis, with a Satoshi being the minimum amount you can exchange, making it an investment for everyone.

To verify a single Bitcoin transaction uses enough electricity to power an average household for 22 days and generates the same carbon footprint as over 750,000 Visa transactions.

In order to mine, you need a mining farm (a set of super computers) which are primarily owned by a small group of people that are employed and funded by a single company. Also China owns 80% of the market for Bitcoin mining hardware which is being integrated with the monetary system, adopted by banks, and regulated by governments…so not so decentralised.

Bitcoin can only process about 3 transactions per second, Ethereum 15 per second and Visa 45,000 per second.

To send $10 from US to Indonesia it’s impossible via bank transfer, costs $30 via UPS and only costs $1 via Bitcoin. To send $10k the fee is $400 via bank transfer, $150 via UPS and still only $1 via Bitcoin. In fact, it would still be just $1 fee via Bitcoin if you was to send $10m whereas the fee via bank transfer would be $400k.

Crypto exchanges already support KYC and AML regulations, making it  ready for iGaming and other highly regulated industries.

“The two biggest use cases for crypto going forwards will be payment methods (primarily for large or international transfers) and investments (supplementing, but not replacing, stocks and bonds).”

In this book, Neel Mehta, 🚀 Adi Agashe and 📍 Parth Detroja break down this highly complex set of tech into a digestible, balanced and comprehensive guide, which I’d recommend to anyone who doesn’t know about the benefits, challenges and future of blockchain and cryptocurrencies.

Lastly it was nice to hear that the creator (Satoshi) of this innovative tech is a fellow Brit.

Mmp

MVP (Minimum Viable Product) – the minimum amount of features needed to validate the business hypothesis with target customers.

MMP (Minimum Marketable Product) – the minimum amount of additional features on top of MVP which will allow marketing to start growing the product.


Validated learning is one of the five principles of the Lean Startup method and the MVP technique aims to test the business hypothesis. MVP was introduced in 2001 by Frank Robinson but popularised by Eric Ries through his book The Lean Startup.

Since startups tend to work under conditions of extreme uncertainty with limited resources, validating the hypothesis with target customers early in an efficient way using a prototype, wireframes, surveys or marketing material becomes even more important if it is to avoid the scenario of spending months or years building a product which customers don’t need or want (does not have product/market fit).

Achieving product/market fit would involve multiple iterations on the MVP based on target customer feedback, but once the product/market fit is validated it’s time to build the product for real and head towards an MMP by adding features to enable marketing to start growing and scaling the product, with the first set of additional features usually focusing on MarTech and improving the core customer experience.

Now, with an Agile mindset of iterating frequently based on value, it makes the MVP technique similar to Agile product development – building a product that customers need, want and loves by frequently talking to customers/target customers and we only need to look at three of the twelve Agile principles (also introduced in 2001) to see this:

Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software.

Simplicity–the art of maximizing the amount of work not done–is essential.

Welcome changing requirements. Agile processes harness change for the customer’s competitive advantage.

Because of this, I prefer to use a broader definition of MVP: the minimum amount of effort needed to learn. This is because you can apply the MVP technique (Agile mindset) to a multitude of scenarios outside of launching a new product at a startup where you get the same benefits of reducing wasted money/effort/time by learning sooner rather than later, whether it’s a:

  • New Product – validate before building the whole product
  • New Feature – experiment rapidly before building and rolling out the full feature
  • New Process – being inclusive/gaining feedback before a full roll-out
  • Retrospective – ensure teams are empowered to make changes before having retros
  • Complex Solutions – start discussions early with assumptions before waiting for concrete answers
  • New House – view before purchasing
  • New Job – research/interview before accepting a job
  • New relationship – dating before marriage
  • New Car – test drive before purchase

Start small and fail fast!

Adding a new feature to an existing product is the most common scenario where you can use an MVP approach, but also where it’s most common for businesses to spend months building a new feature that turns out to be low value to customers. Similar to a new product, it’s important to validate new features where the projected value is uncertain by building a lightweight prototype/wireframes to validate with target customers when conducting interviews.

Saying this, if you have qualitative/quantitive data which gives high confidence that solving the problem will be valuable and time to market is important, then it’s equally effective to just develop and go live with the basics you need for the new feature to function at the right quality, then iterate in an Agile way.

When there is uncertainty, break it down, start small, test and learn quickly and it’s surprising how much easier and efficient the problem is to solve.

With tools to easily conduct remote customer interviews (UserZoom, Lookback.io), A/B testing (Firebase, Maxymiser) and prototyping (Sketch, Figma), it makes it easier more than ever for empowered product teams to efficiently conduct experiments to validate that the solution will solve the problem.

Once you have validated that your product has market fit and you begin to scale, it won’t be long until the product roadmap starts to fill up with valuable product iterations. Soon after that, there will be an appetite from the c-suite to understand how the value on the roadmap can be delivered sooner.

Having to balance solving customer problems, MarTech, tech improvements, tech debt, regulatory, security, bugs, innovation and dev ops requirements with only one development team would make this extremely difficult, as there’s little room to work on some of these different types of work concurrently eg. customer problems concurrently with the more technical driven requirements to improve efficiency.

In order to deliver more value sooner and work on different sets of requirements concurrently, the product would need to scale which would involve adding additional product development teams to the product line. With more development teams working on the product would also require additional firepower from the technical architect and product manager role if delivery is to remain efficient and Lean.

An example of how you can scale the product manager role across multiple development teams who are working on the same product line:

Chief Product Officer (CPO)

  • Managing the Lead Product Managers (although there is often a Product Director to help with this)
  • Handling the high level product vision for the overall product

Head of/Lead/Senior Product Manager of the Product Line(s)

  • Market analysis
  • Product organisation improvements
  • Leading Lean initiatives to reduce waste across the business
  • Cross product line strategies
  • Customer analysis
  • Qual / Quant data analysis
  • Product line strategy
  • Product vision
  • Product roadmap
  • Capacity planning
  • Coaching / supporting product managers

Product Manager / Associate Product Manager working with the Development Team within a Product Line

  • Contributing to the product vision, roadmap and strategies
  • Qual / Quant data analysis incl. conducting customer interviews
  • Backlog prioritisation
  • Epic / feature scoping
  • PRDs
  • Requirement workshops
  • User story definition
  • Detailed acceptance criteria
  • Backlog grooming
  • Sprint planning
  • User acceptance testing
  • Retrospectives
  • Daily stand-up
  • Live product support

The Associate Product Manager could also be referred to as a Product Owner, Junior Product Manager, Product Executive or Business Analyst.

In order to have the necessary focus on the product vision, managing stakeholder expectations, quant/qual data analysis, prioritisation and product strategy, it’s important that when adding additional development teams to the product line that the product manager gets more support too, or otherwise the development team could easily fall into the build trap and start delivering features which customers don’t want or need.

Vision

It’s worth spending time creating a compelling vision statement because it’s something that will be repeated over and over again as it’s the key driver to drum up excitement, passion, investment, confidence and trust that the product direction is aligned to the business, solving a real problem and then, in turn, delivering significant value for the business and customers.

First things first, craft your vision statement which should only be one clear sentence, wherein a nutshell it should explain what you’re looking to deliver, to who and why:

Vision statement

Then create a product vision board specifying who the target market is for your product, problems the product solves, clarifying what the product is and how the product is going to benefit the business and customers:

Vision board

Lastly, having a vision diagram is a great way of providing stakeholders and the business with a visual image of the status of the product capabilities of where you’re at with the product today and where you’re heading. Having colour coding for ‘live’, ‘in progress’, ‘planned’ and ‘to do’ would cover it – there are plenty of mind map tools to help you visualise your product, one of which is Lucidchart which comes as a plugin for Confluence also. It’s important to keep the product diagram focused on high-level features rather than detailed technical solutions around systems as that would be more of a technical architectural diagram:

Vision diagram

Having a solid product vision isn’t just to help the business allocate resource, but it’s also essential for the development team to know exactly where they need to head and why.

Once you have a compelling product vision, it’s time to find out how to get there by creating your VMOST!

Strategy

VMOST = Vision, Missions, Objectives, Strategies and Tactics


Each product line should have a clearly defined product vision, KPIs and strategies if it’s expected for the development team to deliver outcomes/head in the right direction, and using the VMOST canvas is an effective framework of showcasing what these are in a clear and concise format.

Vision: An inspiring statement which typically should only be one sentence, wherein a nutshell it should explain what your ambition is/what is your end goal of the product and who it’s for. More info on creating a compelling product vision can be found here.

Missions: To achieve the product vision, there would be multiple high-level missions you need to go on – what are the biggest problems that need solving before achieving the vision.

Objectives (KPIs): You can track the progress of your missions by setting multiple objectives (aka KPIs), which would include measurable metrics.

Strategies: Initiatives that would deliver/impact the objectives (KPIs).

Tactics: Multiple ideas (Epics) which would deliver each strategy. The tactics should be laid out on the product roadmap, so there’s a nice link between the product VMOST and product roadmap.

Although the product manager is responsible for defining and managing the product VMOST, it mustn’t happen in a silo, as it takes collaboration with the rest of the business especially stakeholders/BI/customers/tech to help provide some guidance on the selection of problems to solve which would be represented on the VMOST.

Once the VMOST is ready, it’s time for the product manager to evangelise this in a passionate way across the business and perhaps print it out on A0 to sit near the Product/Agile Team on the wall, so it can always be top of mind.

Good luck in creating your VMOST!!

Once you’ve defined a compelling Product Vision and VMOST, you will need to map out the ‘what’ and ‘when’ and the Product Roadmap is a great way of visualising the journey.

The Product Roadmap is also a good way of managing expectations with stakeholders, a great visual to collaborate over and view dependencies, as well as giving assurance to the engineers that you do have a well thought out data-focused plan rather than changing your mind daily based on who shouts the loudest.

Key points of a Product Roadmap:

  • It should be at a high-level eg. Epic, feature or iteration level – Epic level is a preference as then it maps nicely to the teams’ product backlog items (PBI) under the epics.
  • It needs to include dates spanning the next twelve months whether monthly or quarterly.
  • The bars on the chart show when items start and when the development will be complete (live hidden).
  • One of the most important things is to educate development teams and stakeholders that the drop dates are an intent (not commitment) of focus/delivery and that things will change, so it’s advisable to avoid spending significant amounts of time making each item exact, as the desire from the business would be to have a rough idea of the twelve-month view rather than knowing whether something starting in six months will be delivered exactly a month later than that for example.
  • The roadmap needs to be easily accessible by anyone in the business where they can use their network login and can also access it from outside the office eg. on the train – if it’s hard to access, people just won’t view it and assume there’s no plan.
  • It needs to be updated frequently – if it’s regularly out of date, again people just won’t access it.

Product Roadmap examples

Roadmap sample 1

Roadmap sample 2

The most important purpose of the Product Roadmap is for you to provide a sign of intent for when product items will be delivered over the next twelve months (your journey to reach your goals/product vision), with the keyword being ‘intent’ here ie. Not an exact drop-dead delivery date. Product Managers with experience of the teams’ velocity could use gut feel also which is acceptable or rough t-shirt sizing from the lead developers, rather than dragging the dev teams away for hours/days to roughly size big pieces of work which will either 1. Change anyway and 2. Be extremely inaccurate as unknowns result in estimates going through the roof.

Lean

A product team is never short of customer problems to solve or ideas to validate, so if there are activities in the idea -> customer flow which are wasteful, then this impacts delivering customer/business value, motivation and time to market.

In the middle of the 20th century, Toyota created an efficient manufacturing concept called Lean which grew out of their Toyota Production System. It is based on the philosophy of defining value from the customer’s viewpoint and continually improving the way in which value is delivered, by eliminating waste or anything which does not contribute to the value goal.

The core 5 principles for adopting a Lean way of working for a digital product are:

  1. Define Value – Understand and define what is valuable to your customers.
  2. Map the Value Stream – Using your customer’s value as a reference point, map out the activities you take to contribute to these values throughout the idea -> customer flow. Also map out all of the activities which don’t contribute to delivering customer value which is essentially waste and should be reduced as much as possible.
  3. Create Flow – Once you have removed the waste from the value stream, the focus should be on ensuring that the remaining activities which are valuable, flow smoothly without interruptions or delays, with some strategies including: DevOps practices, automation, breaking down steps, creating cross-functional departments and training employees to be multi-skilled and adaptive.
  4. Establish Pull – The goal of a pull-based system is to limit your work in process (WIP) items while ensuring that your highest priority customer Product Backlog Items (PBIs) are in a ready state for a smooth flow of work. By following the value stream and working backwards through the idea -> customer flow, you can ensure that your product development will be able to satisfy the needs of your customers.
  5. Pursue Perfection – Every employee should strive towards perfection while delivering products that customers needs and love. The company should be a learning organisation and always find ways to get a little better each and every day.

Some examples of my experience on reducing waste to deliver more customer value:

We introduced DevOps, where we optimised our release pipeline making it 83% quicker to deploy software updates to the team environment and 92% quicker to deploy builds to live.

We reduced the time to market for a new website from 18 months to just 4 weeks! This was achieved by identifying waste through value stream mapping, then using that analysis to simplify the code base and reconfigure some of the hard coded elements of the code (waste) to make them remotely configurable through a CMS.

The last example had the most impact where we merged a floor of front-end developers with a floor of back-end developers to create cross-functional high performing teams.

Good luck in your journey to become Lean!

If you’re a product owner, associate product manager or product manager wanting to understand the full breadth of the product manager role, I’ve put together a generic product manager job description, so that gap analysis can be done to learn and gain experience in your knowledge gaps, which will set you up for success in the world of product management.

It’s unlikely that you will be provided with guidance or training on the full breadth of the product manager role and it’s up to you to proactively fill in your knowledge gap by testing and learning new ways of working with your product, reading books and being curious by collaborating with different areas of the business to find out more about the customer, their role and product performance.

About the role:

The Product Manager will join the product management team and take the pivotal role of managing their product line and its outcome on the customer and business.

The candidate will manage the entire product life-cycle across their product line to solve customer and/or business problems using Agile and Lean principles, by collaborating with their cross-functional team (which also includes a product designer and several engineers), as well as key stakeholders including other product managers across other product lines, BI, commercial, operations, marketing, brand, customer support and legal / compliance teams – the Product Manager is at the heart of the business, so building strong relationships and having good communication skills is important.

The Product Manager is expected to:

  • Define, manage and share the vision, missions, KPI’s, strategies and roadmap for their product line.
  • Own and manage the product backlog, so that the highest priority PBI’s are ready to be solved / validated with a PRD / hypothesis.
  • Manage all aspects of in-life products for their product line, including customer feedback, requirements, and issues.
  • Proactively collect and analyse qualitative and quantitative data to aid prioritisation and to explain why the problem is worth solving.
  • Have a deep understanding of customers by talking to customers and customer support frequently.
  • Collaborate with marketing to continually grow the product.
  • Discover new ideas / problems in collaboration with stakeholders.
  • Drive action across the business to get time sensitive product iterations to market on time.
  • Review how time to market can be reduced across their product line using Lean principles.
  • Manage stakeholder expectations when there are multiple constraints.
  • Adapt to change quickly and creatively find ways to validate ideas with customers in a Lean way.
  • Proactively remove any impediments from getting the value from idea to the customer.
  • Clearly describe what problem we need to solve, the value and customer flows to the development teams and stakeholders.
  • Dynamically switch from live support / BAU to long term strategy on a day-to-day basis.
  • Monitor product performance daily and communicate wins across the business.
  • Monitor and research the market to understand competitor SWOT.
  • Present product performance to senior stakeholders quarterly.
  • Create and share a product delivery update every two weeks.
  • Be the player and use the product frequently including user acceptance testing.
  • Line manage and mentor associate product managers.

Overall

  • Embracing their product line knowledge and effectively sharing with other team members and stakeholders.
  • Evangelising their product.
  • Striving to make progress towards their KPI goals everyday.
  • Leading the go to market (GTM) strategy within Agile methodologies.
  • Focusing on outcomes rather than outputs.
  • Accountable for the success of their product line.

Position Qualification & Experience Requirements

  • Passionate about solving customer problems.
  • Proactive with stakeholder engagement.
  • Proven track record of managing all aspects of a successful product.
  • Strong time management and organisational skills.
  • Experience with Scrum, Kanban and Lean principles and methods.
  • Strong problem solving skills and willingness to roll up one’s sleeves to get the job done.
  • Will give exemplary attention to detail and have excellent communication skills.
  • Is creative with an analytical approach and can easily switch between creative and analytical work.
  • Outgoing, positive and forward thinking.
  • Excellent communicator of product updates, trends, priority and the rationale behind them.
  • Have an obsession with creating great products with your team that customers love.
  • Has a high EQ.
  • Become the voice of the customer – be an expert on quantitative and qualitative insights.
  • Experience with tools such as Tableau, Aha!, Google Analytics, Mixpanel, Jira, Confluence, Lucidchart, Firebase or other equivalent tools.

A thought-provoking read which explains the impossibility of predicting a certain future, but using #experiments, working together and staying open-minded results in a more probable future.

Remarkably this book was written just before the Covid-19 pandemic!

Even though futures are impossible to predict, by having shared, passionate guiding #principles or an inspiring #vision can increase the chances of reaching our goals even with extreme uncertainty, where we only need to look at how art and cathedrals are created as evidence of this.

The book touches on how traditional management is addicted to masterplans and want safety and certainty, not creativity and risk that come with experimentation, which as a result constrains their chance to map a safer future. This section reminded me of Waterfall vs. #Lean/#Agile.

More automation is a common prediction of the future, but Margaret explains that this comes with a risk of falling into a trap: more need for certainty, more dependency on technology; less skill, more need. The more we depend on machines to think for us the less good we become of thinking for ourselves.

“Making the future is a collective activity…the capacity to see multiple futures depends critically on the widest possible range of contributors and collaborators.”

Seeing content by Gary Vaynerchuk for a while now driven by passion and authenticity, I thought his book would be a good read and I wasn’t disappointed.

Like a lot of his content, he gives an authentic and passionate insight into what it takes to achieve your full potential and goals in life.

The book is loaded with questions he’s been asked over the years where he responds with concised authentic answers, with enough context to make you feel inspired and motivated.

“Pumping everyone full of confidence makes for a more creative, risk-taking environment.”

“Passion is an unmatched fuel”

“Maybe we all look for excuses to explain why we don’t achieve what we want to, and we should be more self-aware and recognize how much control we actually have over our own fate…it’s amazing how as soon as you make the shift from “I can’t” to “Why can’t I?” you go from defense to offense, and as everyone knows, the best place to score is always on offense.”

“The only effective way to truly lead is to practice and model the behaviour you want to see in others…the top has to ensure that its values, beliefs, and attitudes trickle down to shape the culture and encourage a productive, innovative, creative, and even happy environment.”

Martin Luther King inspired millions to stand up against inequality and injustice, because he started with WHY.

Apple is worth $2 trillion and managed to build a cultish loyal following, because Steve Jobs always started with WHY.

Simon Sinek is able to repeat his success again and again and inspire others to do the same, because he focuses on WHY.

The Wright Brothers managed to invent, build and fly the first motor operated airplane, because they started with WHY.

Becoming a billion-dollar business or change the course of industries requires a rare special partnership between one who knows WHY and those who know HOW.

Employees give 110% to the mission, when they know WHY.

People don’t buy WHAT you do, they buy WHY you do it.

Another inspiring book by Simon which I’d recommend to anyone in a leadership role.

As 2020 came to an end, I reflected on how I fell in love with books at the start of 2019.

After reading Kaizen by Sarah Harvey and the way I digested the contents and reflected, gave me inspiration to continue…which quickly came into a constant hunger to learn from other people’s experiences and beliefs when it came to product management, leadership and personal development, which has helped me validate, improve and shape my understanding.

The top 3 books which made the most impact / I’ve learnt from most last year:

1. Managing Product = Managing Tension by Marc Abraham

2. Inspired by Marty Cagan

3. The Product Manager’s Survival Guide by Steven Haines

Roll on more learning in 2021!

Very inspiring book by Simon Sinek, where he explains a concept called Circle of Safety, where only when people feel safe will they pull together as a unified team, better able to survive and thrive regardless of the conditions outside.

“When we feel sure they will keep us safe, we will march behind them and work tirelessly to see their visions come to life and proudly call ourselves their followers.”

The book explains well that a title doesn’t make you a leader, but instead leading with purpose having empathy, trust, integrity and creating a safe autonomous environment is key to being an effective leader.

Simon includes stories of the damage which unhealthy cultures can have, includes detailed explanations of the science behind why some teams pull together and some don’t and has fascinating insights into how leadership has changed over the generations which includes an extra chapter on how to lead Millennials.

It’s a must read for anyone responsible for defining and delivering a vision.

In this book Nir Eyal provides a simple yet powerful model to help your customers form habits that connect their problems with your solutions.

The Hooked model focuses on:
An initial ‘trigger’
Which drives an ‘action’
Where you get a ‘variable reward’
Which causes an ‘investment’ due to reciprocation

Nir provides some fascinating insights into how companies have successfully adopted this model eg. Facebook, Twitter, Spotify, Tinder and case studies from The Bible App and Fitbod, where Nir tells his story of the personal benefits he got from Fitbod.

Social media companies and video game makers know these tactics already, but Nir wrote this book so everyone can build products that help people do what they really want, but for the lack of good product design, don’t.

A must-read for everyone who cares about driving customer engagement.

Today’s business world is one that needs more leaders, from a more diverse range of backgrounds and in this book Sarah Wood provides a practical framework to give aspirational leaders the courage and confidence to step up and fulfil their ambitions.

“We are in a relationships age; empathy delivers better business results”

The biggest reason why leaders are failing to step up is because of a confidence gap – not an ability, skills or capability gap!

What makes a good leader has changed over time, from being a dominant personality and didactic style to having leadership qualities of courage, kindness, trust, authenticity and empathy.

Sarah explains that “a love of learning, and the compulsion to continously explore new ideas and put them to the test, is one of the hallmarks of a great leader.”

“As a leader, one of the most important jobs you have is to motivate, encourage and support your team”.

Want to step up? Sarah says “the most important thing is that you get started, as quickly as possible. Done is better than perfect!”

This book is filled with advice and tips from other exceptional leaders which has made an immediate impact on my mindset, so I hope it helps you too.

Product Owner is a job role that came out of Scrum and although many organisations use it as a job title that is interchangeable with Product Manager, it’s not correct. In Scrum the Product Owner is defined as the person who is responsible for creating PBI’s and grooming the backlog, in Agile it was defined as the representative of the business, and neither entirely describe the full breadth of a Product Manager’s responsibilities.

Product Owner is a role you play in an Agile team, whereas a Product Manager is the job title of someone responsible for a product and its outcome on the customer and the business.

Now a lot of Product Owners out there are great Product Managers, and they should just change their title. But a fair number of Product Owners have simply completed a certified Scrum product owner course and are told to just get on with managing the development backlog, which sets them up to fail as they never consider the broader role. So if you’re tasking a Product Owner with the broader product management responsibilities, make sure you provide the training they need to master the full breadth of the role (and then change their title).

The structure of the product organisation and culture also has a bearing on whether you have the autonomy to fulfil the Product Manager job. When using Agile / Lean methods it should be the Agile team (Product Manager, Product Designer and Dev team) who make the key product decisions / trade offs, instead it can often be held centrally at a senior management level, where multiple Product Managers / Owners are assigned random projects from a roadmap to just execute which is a more Waterfall / Project Management approach. Those who find themselves in this situation should find haven in a more empowered/Agile/product led organisation which will accelerate their learning and understanding of the full breadth of the Product Manager job.

It takes courage to ask a question rather than offer up advice, but in this book 📚 Michael Bungay Stanier gives seven questions and the tools to make them an everday way to work less hard and have more impact.

On communication and habits, Michael says that the single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place already and that 45% of our waking behaviour is habitual.

Michael touches on learning and explains that “people don’t really learn when you tell them something.

They don’t even really learn when they do something.

They start learning, start creating new neural pathways, only when they have a chance to recall and reflect on what just happened.”

“When we take time and effort to generate knowledge and find an answer rather than just reading it, our memory retention is increased.”

The book is structured around seven key questions…

🔸️ The Kickstart Question
🔸️ The Awe Question
🔸️ The Focus Question
🔸️ The Foundation Question
🔸️ The Lazy Question
🔸️ The Strategic Question
🔸️ The Learning Question

…but you’ll need to buy this great book to find out what the questions are!

In this book L. David Marquet tells a remarkable true story of how he transformed a low performing team of 134 passive followers, into high performing empowered active leaders who received a plethora of awards as a result of their successes.

Marquet explains “You may be able to “buy” a person’s back with a paycheck, position, power, or fear, but human being’s genius, passion, loyalty, and tenancious creativity are volunteered only.”

Having independent, energetic, emotionally committed and engaged individuals thinking about what they needed to do and ways to do it right achieved excellence.

“Simply providing data to the teams on their relative performance results in natural desire to improve.”

Guiding principles the team used to achieve excellence:

🔸️ Initiative
🔸️ Innovation
🔸️ Intimate Technical Knowledge
🔸️ Courage
🔸️ Commitment
🔸️ Continuous Improvement
🔸️ Integrity
🔸️ Empowerment
🔸️ Teamwork
🔸️ Openness
🔸️ Timeliness

Leadership at Every Level!

“Ultimately, the most important person to have control over is yourself – for it is that self-control that will allow you to “give control, create leaders”.”

Really glad I bought this book by Noel Tichy – the inspiring stories and explanations gave me plenty of opportunity to self-reflect about my leadership capabilities, which has explained a lot and given me confidence that I’m heading in the right direction.

Tichy explains how organisations that have a Leadership Engine win because they have leaders at every level who teach others to be leaders. Teaching and learning are at the heart of these organisations.

“A crucial element in this process is that winning leaders and winning companies use mistakes as coaching opportunities rather than causes for punishment. Treating mistakes as learning experiences, in fact, is one of the ways in which winning leaders encourage others to develop edge and take the risk of making tough decisions.”

I’d definitely recommend this book.