Archive for the ‘Web Design’ Category

Done

Once the product backlog is in a good quality condition and the product backlog items (PBIs) start moving into development, there’s a significant amount of tasks to tick off before the feature can be marked as ‘done’.

Typically a development team would use a ‘definition of done’ (DoD) as a reference to ensure that none of the processes get missed off before it’s ‘done’, as each of those processes are essential and could have considerable consequences for the business and customers if it’s not done.

Some examples of what could be in a definition of done:

  • Code is reviewed by someone who didn’t do the PBI
  • Code is deployed to test environment
  • Feature is tested against acceptance criteria
  • Feature passes regression testing
  • Feature passes smoke test
  • Feature is documented
  • Feature approved by UX designer / stakeholder
  • Feature approved by Product Owner

Missing any of the DoD processes before a feature gets delivered to a customer could result in critical bugs across the feature, causing bugs across other features in the code, bring down the product or delivering the wrong requirement, so it’s essential to take the definition of done seriously even if it means taking the PBI over to the next sprint resulting in potentially not meeting a sprint goal.

Invest

In order to avoid lots of panic and chaos the day before sprint planning because there’s no work in a ‘ready‘ state, it’s essential to have regular backlog grooming sessions which would result in having at least six weeks’ worth of high priority ‘ready’ work in the product backlog.

To get PBI’s (Product Backlog Items) in a ready state, it can take a lot of effort especially when it comes to chasing down dependencies or getting answers around the business requirements, but this is where the Scrum Master comes in to help out – although the Product Owner owns the product backlog, it’s the responsibility of the Scrum Master to help, guide and support the team to ensure they’re having frequent effective backlog grooming sessions, so there’s a good few weeks worth of ready PBI’s.

A new PBI is the start of a conversation and shouldn’t include solutions, so there should be ongoing questions around the requirements well in advance of the work going into development, until the development team feel they have enough information to size the PBI and then mark it as ready if there’s no dependencies.

It’s important to have a good quality product backlog (high priority items in a ready state) and frequently groom PBIs, to ensure the development teams are not only working on the highest priority items, but also that they’re working in an efficient way.

Some tips to getting a good quality product backlog:

  1. Create the user stories and prioritise in the backlog sooner rather than later – as a minimum the story needs to include ‘as a’, ‘I want’, ‘so that’ language with some high level acceptance criteria which will help start the conversation with the developers, giving them weeks to ask questions up front before it appears towards the top of the backlog.
  2. Making the problem / requirements clear with a stakeholder point of contact within the story for reference
  3. Having a clear title (summary) to the story, so you don’t have to open it up to find out what it’s about
  4. When there are questions from the developers to answer either by the Sub Product Owner (or Product Owner), stakeholders or technical, try to avoid leaving these unanswered for days – these should be responded to immediately as a priority
  5. For the ‘Feature Backlog‘ to be presented to the team monthly or bi-monthly, so they know clearly what the value of the relevant PBI’s are with some context around them
  6. Having flexible backlog grooming sessions – there’s no rule here, the teams can get together everyday if they like to groom the backlog until they’ve caught up
  7. Reinforcing to the development teams that they don’t need to know exactly what code to write and where in order to size the PBI, but instead the sizing should be based on a suitable solution making some assumptions
  8. Attaching customer flows / UX to the PBIs, with a link to ‘As Is’ and ‘To Be’ documentation

At least 10% of the teams time should be spent on grooming the product backlog and unless enough time is invested or they don’t get the support they need from the Scrum Master or Product Owner, then there’s risk of inefficiencies or the teams working on low priority PBI’s (Product Backlog Items) as the high priority items aren’t being groomed enough in time for sprint planning.

Vision

It’s worth spending time coming up with a compelling vision statement, because it’s something which will be repeated over and over again as it’s the key driver to drum up excitement, passion, investment, confidence and trust that the product end goal is rather spectacular, solving the big problems and then in turn delivering huge value for the business and customers.

First things first, craft your vision statement which should only be one clear sentence, where in a nutshell it should explain what you’re looking to deliver, to who and why giving off a wow factor:

Vision statement

Then create a product vision board specifying who the target market is for your product, problems the product solves, clarifying what the product is and how the product is going to benefit the business and customers:

Vision board

Lastly, having a vision diagram is a great way of providing stakeholders and the business with a snapshot using one image of where you’re at with the product and where you’re heading. Having colour coding for ‘live’, ‘in progress’, ‘planned’ and ‘to do’ would cover it – there are plenty of mind map tools to help you visualise your product, one of which is Lucidchart which comes as a plugin for Confluence also. It’s important to keep the product diagram focused on high level features rather than detailed technical solutions around systems as that would be more of a technical architectural diagram:

Vision diagram

Having a solid product vision isn’t just to help the business allocate resource, but it’s also essential for the developers to know exactly where they need to head and ‘why’.

The Product Group London

If you’re a Product Owner or Product Manager and would like to participate in a variety of interesting product focused discussions, then The Product Group London is for you.

It’s also an opportunity to meet, interact and network with those in a similar role who solve similar problems and have similar challenges.

At the monthly meetups there’s normally a topic of the night and a featured product which gets discussed. For example, the July 2018 agenda was:

  1. Topic of the Night: Developing the role of product management – how do you develop the role of product management in organisations that either (1) have no formal product function, (2) have a product function that is not realising its potential, or (3) have a well-established function and need to develop it to the next level?
  2. Featured Product: Clear Review – Stuart Hearn, Founder & CEO

You can also:

ScrumCards

A self-organised development team working together successfully to achieve common goals within the sprint boundary (typically every two weeks) is only possible if the teams ceremonies are done which includes:

  1. Daily stand-up – the scrum team need to meetup daily on time to discuss what they did yesterday, what they’re planning to do today, highlight any dependencies, issues or help they might need
  2. Updating the scrum board daily – whether the source of truth is the physical board or a digital version eg. JIRA, the scrum board needs to reflect the current state of play with regards to the sprint progress, so the team can understand how they’re progressing with their sprint commitments and sprint goals
  3. Regular backlog grooming sessions – in order for the development team to be able to work on the highest priority PBIs (Product Backlog Items) in the next sprint, they need to ensure they meet up regularly in order to get at least the next three sprints highest priority backlog items in a ‘ready‘ state
  4. Roughly sizing the backlog – in order to predict when customers will receive tweaks to the product, it’s important that the product backlog is roughly sized to aid delivery ETAs, but also prioritisation
  5. Retrospectives – meeting up once a sprint to discuss what could have gone better in the last sprint, what went well and what to continue doing. The format is flexible and the most important thing to do at the start of any retrospective is to focus on actions front the last retrospective – unless actions are done (the team learns), retrospectives are pointless, so it’s absolutely crucial that the things which the teams are keen to change / improve on is actioned or tried at least.
  6. Sprint review – showcasing what awesome iterations the team has been working on to get feedback and a round of applause from stakeholders

In order for the scrum team to be able to fulfill their commitments they should be getting significant help, guidance and support from the Scrum Master or Team Lead, Product Owner and the Development Manager and only once the above points (basics) are being done well, can a team start to seriously look to improve their velocity and scale successfully.

Kpi

In order to prioritise effectively you need both the projected value and effort, but these aren’t always easy to come by. Projecting value can be particularly challenging if the data isn’t easily accessible which can have a knock on effect when analysing your KPIs (Key Performance Indicators).

Ensuring that a product / feature have KPIs is beneficial for a few reasons including: Aiding prioritisation, celebrating success, feeding back on software development iterations and to feed into the general product vision and wider business goals.

Your KPIs don’t have to be a financial value (although a good attempt at projecting a monetary value should be made to aid ROI projections) or just one KPI, but they just need to be measurable, an indication of success and for them to be linked in someway to the overall business goals, so how can you identify what your KPIs are:

  • Incremental revenue – benchmarking on existing revenue volumes for the relevant feature in question. What do you anticipate increasing the revenue / ARPU by
  • How many customer queries are you hoping to reduce and how much does it cost per contact
  • Is it solving a common problem / request that high value players have been submitting
  • Will solving the problem increase website stability, reducing downtime for customers
  • Are you expecting to increase customer acquisition numbers / conversion rate
  • Will it increase retention rates – a measure of this is churn rate / drop off as well as LTV
  • Efficiency savings – by completing a piece of work could it increase team output / Velocity whether it be development or a marketing team
  • Feature traffic / usage – if conversions or direct revenue from the feature isn’t relevant then at a minimum having sessions, dwell time and value of customers using the feature can be used as a KPI

    Identifying your KPIs is one thing, but having the data available at your disposal on a self-service basis to cut, analyse and share is naturally fundamental, but once you have identified your KPIs and have access to the data, you can be confident that you’re well equipped to contribute to the Agile piece, but also your helping meet the wider business goals.

    Agile

    There are two main definitions of ‘Agile’ which people tend to refer to when:

    1. Delivering software iteratively and in increments rather than holding all of the software back delivering one big release somewhere down the line
    2. The business responds to change / demands rather than sticking to a long term strategy just because it was previously agreed

    Both definitions of the term are valid, but in software development the first use is most common whereas everyone else in a business typically refer to the second.

    Scrum is the most common Agile framework where typically the expectation is that you release code / software to live every fortnight / within the Sprint whether it uses a feature switch or setting the code live to customers. This has many benefits such as:

    1. Realising value sooner – value being delivered within the sprint off the back of the development work the team committed to during sprint planning
    2. Predictability of future software releases
    3. General team organisation – all work in the sprint will be fully done so you won’t have to deal with the previous sprints pre-production testing or release in the following fresh sprint, making it less messy and reducing the impact of context switching (Dev Ops culture – continuous delivery)
    4. Responding to customer feedback quicker adjusting scope for future iterations off the back of it
    5. Large chunks of development work won’t be sitting on the shelf collecting dust or thrown away without any customer / end user receiving any of the goods
    6. Ability to deliver the highest ROI pieces of work, so rather than having to wait until a feature is gold plated, you may find after the 3rd iteration that the majority of value has been delivered, therefore it might be higher priority to start work on another feature than fully completing the existing one
    7. Self organising, cross functional teams including UX and design

    Only once you’ve ticked off all of the above can you say that you develop software in an Agile way.

    The business use of the term Agile is more focused on the ability to adapt to change quickly and shuffle around priorities to meet changing core objectives within a reasonable time frame, rather than continuing to work on something which will generate half the ROI than another feature or a feature which is no longer needed. Naturally you need to include any context switching cost when changing in flight priorities and it’s recommended not to change high level priorities frequently because you may find yourself delivering very little over time and instead just causing lots of admin and frustrated developers.

    Being Agile is certainly not easy to achieve, but having the ambition and desire to start delivering value in an Agile way is something which is definitely worth any necessary process or infrastructure change in order for the benefits of Agile to be unlocked.