Range: How Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World

Posted: Jan 30, 2022 in Book Reviews, Psychology
Tags: , , ,

Fascinating book full of stories about how athletes, scientists, inventors, technologists, teachers, and musicians have needed ‘range’ to succeed.

Having ‘range’ is essentially having a variety of different skills. David Epstein explains throughout the book that by experimenting across different experiences and sectors you’ll learn different skills along the way, helping you to develop range, which means you’re less susceptible to bias, more likely to find your true potential, and able to handle complex and unpredictable situations with more success.

It wasn’t an easy read, but a unique, thought-provoking and interesting one.

“…exposure to modern work with self-directed problem solving and nonrepetitive challenges was correlated with being ‘cognitively flexible’.”

“The more confident a learner is of their wrong answer, the better the information sticks when they subsequently learn the right answer. Tolerating big mistakes can create the best learning opportunities.”

“A person don’t know what he can do unless he tries. Trying things is the answer to find your talent.”

“Struggling to generate an answer in your own, even a wrong one, enhances subsequent learning. Socrates was apparently on to something when he forced pupils to generate answers rather than bestowing them. It requires the learner to intentionally sacrifice current performance for future benefit.”

“A jack of all trades is a master of none, but oftentimes better than a master of one.”

Comments
  1. One of my favorite books.

    Liked by 1 person

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