The ‘Product Roadmap’

Posted: Jul 24, 2018 in Business, Data, Guides, Product Development
Tags: , , ,

Once you’ve created a solid Product Vision, it’s likely you’ll be asked to provide more granular details on the ‘what’ and ‘when’ and the Product Roadmap is a great way of helping you answer that.

The product roadmap is also a good way of giving the development teams an idea of the exciting upcoming features / problems to solve for the product.

Key points of a Product Roadmap:

  • It should be at a high level eg. Epic, feature or iteration level – Epic level is a preference as then it maps nicely to the product backlog items (PBI)
  • It needs to include dates spanning the next twelve months whether monthly or quarterly
  • The bars on the chart show when items start and when the development will be complete (live hidden)
  • One of the most important things is to educate development teams and stakeholders that the drop dates are an intent (not commitment) of focus / delivery and that things can and will likely change, so it’s advisable to avoid spending significant amounts of time making each item exact, as the desire from the business would be to have a rough idea of the twelve month view rather than knowing whether something starting in six months time will be delivered exactly a month later than that for example
  • The roadmap needs to be easily accessible by anyone in the business where they can use their network login and can also access it from outside the office eg. on the train – if it’s hard to access, people just won’t view it and assume there’s no plan
  • It needs to be updated frequently – if it’s regularly out of date, again people just won’t access it

Product Roadmap examples

Roadmap sample 1

Roadmap sample 2

The most important thing about the Product Roadmap is to always provide a sign of intent for when product items will be delivered over the next twelve months, with the key word being ‘intent’ here ie. Not exact drop dead delivery date and a couple of people with experience of productivity could use gut feel which is totally acceptable, rather than dragging developers away for days on end to roughly size big pieces of work which will either 1. Change anyway and 2. Be extremely inaccurate as unknowns result in estimates going through the roof.

A sign of intent for the next twelve months for the product is also better than a half empty roadmap!

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