Problem solving & identifying value

Posted: September 16, 2016 in Business, Data, Product Development, Web Design
Tags: , , , , ,

Problem solving image

There will never be a lack of problems to solve when it comes to product development, but handling the relentless amount of ideas and identifying the right ones to focus on can be tricky if a robust process to prioritise and track all of these is not in place.

There are many approaches you can take to handle problems and prioritisation, some product management videos I’ve seen describe the product owner to spend most of their time saying ‘NO’ to stakeholders which I tend to disagree with, because technically all problems can be solved and an idea is never a bad idea, but perhaps it just can’t be solved right now due to higher priority work, so a response to show appreciation for raising the idea / problem and that it’ll go through the prioritisation process is a more appropriate response. Some also handle prioritisation and requests by who shouts and flaps the loudest which is equally not the way to go about effective backlog prioritisation.

Two things you need in order to prioritise effectively 1. Value and 2. Effort to work out the projected ROI. Before you even spend effort discussing how much effort a problem will take to solve, the first thing which should be asked when someone approaches you with a problem, idea or bug is “what is the value?”. As a result of this, you may get:

  • A sheepish response where they don’t know, so they’ll have to go and find out (in some cases resulting in the problem being so small it’s not worth solving it, so you don’t get to hear about the problem anymore)
  • Value provided is minimal (relative to everything else in the backlog)
  • A fluffy response eg. It’ll increase traffic, it’ll increase retention rates etc, with no given metric
  • A significant problem / idea to solve which could deliver vast amounts of incremental revenue, benefits to customers or savings through efficiencies which should be fast tracked through the effort sizing and prioritisation process

Another question which can be asked to identify value is “what happens if we don’t do it for 3 months, 6 months or never” which will aid prioritisation further.

At your disposal you should have a data visualisation tool to easily view trend data and access KPIs for your products and features which is another way of identifying value for yourself, but ensuring that you and your Scrum teams are working to solve the highest value problems is fundamental in achieving a healthy ROI and successful product, so by asking just some simple questions up front will make your journey a lot more palatable.

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